Hepatitis A, B, and C

John Christenson, John J. Manaloor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

• On the basis of strong epidemiologic evidence, hepatitis viruses are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and children throughout the world. (1)(22)(33) • On the basis of research evidence, hepatitis A and B vaccines are effective in preventing disease. Furthermore, data strongly demonstrate that hepatitis A and B vaccines are safe in young infants and children. (23)(24)(26)(34) • On the basis of strong evidence, pregnant mothers should be screened and concomitant active and passive immunization against hepatitis B should be provided to newborns as a strategy to prevent chronic hepatitis B in children. (44)(47) • On the basis of new research, the use of antiviral agents is beneficial in the treatment of and potential clearance of chronic infections caused by hepatitis B and C viruses. (54)(55)(57)(58).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-438
Number of pages13
JournalPediatrics in Review
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hepatitis A
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis Viruses
Passive Immunization
Chronic Hepatitis B
Research
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Antiviral Agents
Vaccination
Mothers
Newborn Infant
Morbidity
Mortality
Infection
twinrix
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hepatitis A, B, and C. / Christenson, John; Manaloor, John J.

In: Pediatrics in Review, Vol. 37, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 426-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christenson, John ; Manaloor, John J. / Hepatitis A, B, and C. In: Pediatrics in Review. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 10. pp. 426-438.
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