Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications

Sidharth S. Bhardwaj, Naga Chalasani

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders and diabetes are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States. Figures 1 and 2 show a classification of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. Use of these agents has continuously increased due to the improved recognition of these disorders and their complications. Additionally, the ever-growing problem of obesity and the metabolic syndrome has caused an increase in the incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and subsequent coronary artery disease and dysrhythmias. There is high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and distinguishing medication-induced liver disease from underlying liver disease can be difficult. This leads to difficulty in distinguishing whether the liver disease is due to cardiovascular or diabetic drugs themselves or is a manifestation of underlying liver disease resulting from metabolic disorders and diabetes. Evolving data suggest that patients with diabetes may have higher risk of drug-induced liver disease than nondiabetic individuals. Diabetic patients who take oral hypoglycemics have a higher risk of developing drug-induced liver disease than those not taking these medications (1,2). An excellent review was recently published by Wang and colleagues that provided a detailed review of existing human and animal studies supporting the notion that patients with diabetes are generally at higher risk for developing drug hepatotoxicity (3).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDrug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages593-630
Number of pages38
ISBN (Electronic)9781420021141
ISBN (Print)9780849398964
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Hypoglycemic Agents
Liver Diseases
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury
Dyslipidemias
Obesity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Coronary Artery Disease
Hypertension
Incidence
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Bhardwaj, S. S., & Chalasani, N. (2007). Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. In Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition (pp. 593-630). CRC Press.

Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. / Bhardwaj, Sidharth S.; Chalasani, Naga.

Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2007. p. 593-630.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bhardwaj, SS & Chalasani, N 2007, Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. in Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition. CRC Press, pp. 593-630.
Bhardwaj SS, Chalasani N. Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. In Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition. CRC Press. 2007. p. 593-630
Bhardwaj, Sidharth S. ; Chalasani, Naga. / Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2007. pp. 593-630
@inbook{a5c9705f6b404bd39b7d1eee5da9c038,
title = "Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications",
abstract = "Drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders and diabetes are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States. Figures 1 and 2 show a classification of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. Use of these agents has continuously increased due to the improved recognition of these disorders and their complications. Additionally, the ever-growing problem of obesity and the metabolic syndrome has caused an increase in the incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and subsequent coronary artery disease and dysrhythmias. There is high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and distinguishing medication-induced liver disease from underlying liver disease can be difficult. This leads to difficulty in distinguishing whether the liver disease is due to cardiovascular or diabetic drugs themselves or is a manifestation of underlying liver disease resulting from metabolic disorders and diabetes. Evolving data suggest that patients with diabetes may have higher risk of drug-induced liver disease than nondiabetic individuals. Diabetic patients who take oral hypoglycemics have a higher risk of developing drug-induced liver disease than those not taking these medications (1,2). An excellent review was recently published by Wang and colleagues that provided a detailed review of existing human and animal studies supporting the notion that patients with diabetes are generally at higher risk for developing drug hepatotoxicity (3).",
author = "Bhardwaj, {Sidharth S.} and Naga Chalasani",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780849398964",
pages = "593--630",
booktitle = "Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition",
publisher = "CRC Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Hepatotoxicity of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications

AU - Bhardwaj, Sidharth S.

AU - Chalasani, Naga

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - Drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders and diabetes are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States. Figures 1 and 2 show a classification of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. Use of these agents has continuously increased due to the improved recognition of these disorders and their complications. Additionally, the ever-growing problem of obesity and the metabolic syndrome has caused an increase in the incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and subsequent coronary artery disease and dysrhythmias. There is high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and distinguishing medication-induced liver disease from underlying liver disease can be difficult. This leads to difficulty in distinguishing whether the liver disease is due to cardiovascular or diabetic drugs themselves or is a manifestation of underlying liver disease resulting from metabolic disorders and diabetes. Evolving data suggest that patients with diabetes may have higher risk of drug-induced liver disease than nondiabetic individuals. Diabetic patients who take oral hypoglycemics have a higher risk of developing drug-induced liver disease than those not taking these medications (1,2). An excellent review was recently published by Wang and colleagues that provided a detailed review of existing human and animal studies supporting the notion that patients with diabetes are generally at higher risk for developing drug hepatotoxicity (3).

AB - Drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders and diabetes are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States. Figures 1 and 2 show a classification of cardiovascular and antidiabetic medications. Use of these agents has continuously increased due to the improved recognition of these disorders and their complications. Additionally, the ever-growing problem of obesity and the metabolic syndrome has caused an increase in the incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and subsequent coronary artery disease and dysrhythmias. There is high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and distinguishing medication-induced liver disease from underlying liver disease can be difficult. This leads to difficulty in distinguishing whether the liver disease is due to cardiovascular or diabetic drugs themselves or is a manifestation of underlying liver disease resulting from metabolic disorders and diabetes. Evolving data suggest that patients with diabetes may have higher risk of drug-induced liver disease than nondiabetic individuals. Diabetic patients who take oral hypoglycemics have a higher risk of developing drug-induced liver disease than those not taking these medications (1,2). An excellent review was recently published by Wang and colleagues that provided a detailed review of existing human and animal studies supporting the notion that patients with diabetes are generally at higher risk for developing drug hepatotoxicity (3).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016026286&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85016026286&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85016026286

SN - 9780849398964

SP - 593

EP - 630

BT - Drug-Induced Liver Disease, Second Edition

PB - CRC Press

ER -