High intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

Early United States clinical experience

Richard Bihrle, Richard Foster, N. T. Sanghvi, J. P. Donohue, P. J. Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High intensity focused ultrasound via a transrectal approach was used to treat 15 patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. The first 10 of these 15 patients underwent continuous temperature monitoring of the periprostatic region throughout the treatment. Patients undergoing transperineal thermocouple placement for the purpose of thermometry were treated while under general or spinal anesthesia, whereas 4 of the 5 remaining patients were successfully treated using intravenous sedation alone. Of the 10 patients 9 did not demonstrate a significant temperature elevation. One patient with a small prostatic anteroposterior diameter had a transient elevation of 17C. No patient experienced a complication related to periprostatic heating. Followup was available at 90 days in all patients. At 90 days the symptom scores decreased from a pretreatment value (American Urological Association questions 1 to 7) of 31.2 (range 22 to 38) to 15.8 (range 8 to 31). Peak flow rate increased by a mean of 4.7 ml. per second from 9.3 ml. per second before treatment to 14.0 ml. per second at 90 days. The most frequent complication was that of transient urinary retention in 11 of 15 patients (73.3%) and hematospermia in 7 (46.7%). No adverse reactions persisted at 90 days. This study represents an initial attempt using high intensity focused ultrasound to treat symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Overall, the safety and effectiveness of high intensity focused ultrasound demonstrated in this pilot study are encouraging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1271-1275
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume151
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1994

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Prostatic Hyperplasia
Therapeutics
Hemospermia
Thermometry
Temperature
Urinary Retention
Spinal Anesthesia
Heating
General Anesthesia
Safety

Keywords

  • prostate
  • prostatic hypertrophy
  • ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

High intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia : Early United States clinical experience. / Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard; Sanghvi, N. T.; Donohue, J. P.; Hood, P. J.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 151, No. 5, 1994, p. 1271-1275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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