Hippocampal volume reduction in schizophrenia as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging: A meta-analytic study

Michael D. Nelson, Andrew Saykin, Laura A. Flashman, Henry J. Riordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

597 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although many quantitative magnetic resonance imaging studies have found significant volume reductions in the hippocampi of patients with schizophrenia compared with those of normal control subjects, others have not. Therefore, the issue of hippocampal volume differences associated with schizophrenia remains in question. Methods: Two meta-analyses were conducted to reduce the potential effects of sampling error and methodological differences in data acquisition and analysis. Eighteen studies with a total patient number of 522 and a total control number of 426 met the initial selection criteria. Results: Meta-analysis 1 yielded mean effect sizes of 0.37 (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-440
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Meta-Analysis
Schizophrenia
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Selection Bias
Patient Selection
Hippocampus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Hippocampal volume reduction in schizophrenia as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging : A meta-analytic study. / Nelson, Michael D.; Saykin, Andrew; Flashman, Laura A.; Riordan, Henry J.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 55, No. 5, 1998, p. 433-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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