Histopathologic grading of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease: Lack of prognostic significance in 254 surgically staged patients

Jay Hess, S. Bodis, G. Pinkus, B. Silver, P. Mauch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The cellular composition of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease (NS-HD) varies greatly from patient to patient. It is unclear whether subclassifying NS-HD based on cellular composition has prognostic value, because reported studies examining this issue have shown conflicting results. Methods. The initial pathology slides of 254 surgically staged patients with NS-HD treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy were reviewed and subclassified according to British National Lymphoma Investigation criteria. The median follow-up time was 123 months. Results. A total of 211 patients were classified NS I histology (83%), and 43 patients were classified NS II (17%). There were no differences in the distribution of NS I/NS II patients by age, number of sites of disease, B symptoms, or extent of mediastinal disease. Patients with NS II disease were more likely to be male (P = 0.001), and to have pathologic Stage I-II disease (P = 0.07). The 15-year actuarial rates of disease-free survival were 77 and 80% for NS I and NS II patients, respectively (P = not significant). The 15-year overall survival rates were 87 and 93% for NS I and NS II, respectively (P = not significant). No differences were seen between NS I and NS II patients for overall or disease free survival when analyzed separately by pathologic stage or by initial treatment. Similarly, no differences between NS I and NS II patients were seen in the large subgroup of 155 pathologic stage IA-IIA patients treated with radiation therapy alone. When other histologic parameters were analyzed separately, no differences were seen in the frequency of relapse between the groups based on extent of necrosis, atypia, fibrosis, variant atypia, variant syncytia, eosinophilia, or number of mitoses. Conclusions. The histologic subclassification of Hodgkin's disease had no prognostic significance in this group of surgically staged, uniformly treated patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-714
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sclerosis
Hodgkin Disease
Disease-Free Survival
Radiotherapy
Mediastinal Diseases
Eosinophilia
Giant Cells
Mitosis
Lymphoma
Histology
Fibrosis
Necrosis
Survival Rate
Pathology

Keywords

  • histologic subclassification
  • Hodgkin's disease
  • laparotomy
  • nodular sclerosis
  • prognosis
  • radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Histopathologic grading of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease : Lack of prognostic significance in 254 surgically staged patients. / Hess, Jay; Bodis, S.; Pinkus, G.; Silver, B.; Mauch, P.

In: Cancer, Vol. 74, No. 2, 1994, p. 708-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1bce3472e51940bcbdf9262cdadb2156,
title = "Histopathologic grading of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease: Lack of prognostic significance in 254 surgically staged patients",
abstract = "Background. The cellular composition of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease (NS-HD) varies greatly from patient to patient. It is unclear whether subclassifying NS-HD based on cellular composition has prognostic value, because reported studies examining this issue have shown conflicting results. Methods. The initial pathology slides of 254 surgically staged patients with NS-HD treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy were reviewed and subclassified according to British National Lymphoma Investigation criteria. The median follow-up time was 123 months. Results. A total of 211 patients were classified NS I histology (83{\%}), and 43 patients were classified NS II (17{\%}). There were no differences in the distribution of NS I/NS II patients by age, number of sites of disease, B symptoms, or extent of mediastinal disease. Patients with NS II disease were more likely to be male (P = 0.001), and to have pathologic Stage I-II disease (P = 0.07). The 15-year actuarial rates of disease-free survival were 77 and 80{\%} for NS I and NS II patients, respectively (P = not significant). The 15-year overall survival rates were 87 and 93{\%} for NS I and NS II, respectively (P = not significant). No differences were seen between NS I and NS II patients for overall or disease free survival when analyzed separately by pathologic stage or by initial treatment. Similarly, no differences between NS I and NS II patients were seen in the large subgroup of 155 pathologic stage IA-IIA patients treated with radiation therapy alone. When other histologic parameters were analyzed separately, no differences were seen in the frequency of relapse between the groups based on extent of necrosis, atypia, fibrosis, variant atypia, variant syncytia, eosinophilia, or number of mitoses. Conclusions. The histologic subclassification of Hodgkin's disease had no prognostic significance in this group of surgically staged, uniformly treated patients.",
keywords = "histologic subclassification, Hodgkin's disease, laparotomy, nodular sclerosis, prognosis, radiation therapy",
author = "Jay Hess and S. Bodis and G. Pinkus and B. Silver and P. Mauch",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1002/1097-0142(19940715)74:2<708::AID-CNCR2820740226>3.0.CO;2-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "74",
pages = "708--714",
journal = "Cancer",
issn = "0008-543X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Histopathologic grading of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease

T2 - Lack of prognostic significance in 254 surgically staged patients

AU - Hess, Jay

AU - Bodis, S.

AU - Pinkus, G.

AU - Silver, B.

AU - Mauch, P.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Background. The cellular composition of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease (NS-HD) varies greatly from patient to patient. It is unclear whether subclassifying NS-HD based on cellular composition has prognostic value, because reported studies examining this issue have shown conflicting results. Methods. The initial pathology slides of 254 surgically staged patients with NS-HD treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy were reviewed and subclassified according to British National Lymphoma Investigation criteria. The median follow-up time was 123 months. Results. A total of 211 patients were classified NS I histology (83%), and 43 patients were classified NS II (17%). There were no differences in the distribution of NS I/NS II patients by age, number of sites of disease, B symptoms, or extent of mediastinal disease. Patients with NS II disease were more likely to be male (P = 0.001), and to have pathologic Stage I-II disease (P = 0.07). The 15-year actuarial rates of disease-free survival were 77 and 80% for NS I and NS II patients, respectively (P = not significant). The 15-year overall survival rates were 87 and 93% for NS I and NS II, respectively (P = not significant). No differences were seen between NS I and NS II patients for overall or disease free survival when analyzed separately by pathologic stage or by initial treatment. Similarly, no differences between NS I and NS II patients were seen in the large subgroup of 155 pathologic stage IA-IIA patients treated with radiation therapy alone. When other histologic parameters were analyzed separately, no differences were seen in the frequency of relapse between the groups based on extent of necrosis, atypia, fibrosis, variant atypia, variant syncytia, eosinophilia, or number of mitoses. Conclusions. The histologic subclassification of Hodgkin's disease had no prognostic significance in this group of surgically staged, uniformly treated patients.

AB - Background. The cellular composition of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease (NS-HD) varies greatly from patient to patient. It is unclear whether subclassifying NS-HD based on cellular composition has prognostic value, because reported studies examining this issue have shown conflicting results. Methods. The initial pathology slides of 254 surgically staged patients with NS-HD treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy were reviewed and subclassified according to British National Lymphoma Investigation criteria. The median follow-up time was 123 months. Results. A total of 211 patients were classified NS I histology (83%), and 43 patients were classified NS II (17%). There were no differences in the distribution of NS I/NS II patients by age, number of sites of disease, B symptoms, or extent of mediastinal disease. Patients with NS II disease were more likely to be male (P = 0.001), and to have pathologic Stage I-II disease (P = 0.07). The 15-year actuarial rates of disease-free survival were 77 and 80% for NS I and NS II patients, respectively (P = not significant). The 15-year overall survival rates were 87 and 93% for NS I and NS II, respectively (P = not significant). No differences were seen between NS I and NS II patients for overall or disease free survival when analyzed separately by pathologic stage or by initial treatment. Similarly, no differences between NS I and NS II patients were seen in the large subgroup of 155 pathologic stage IA-IIA patients treated with radiation therapy alone. When other histologic parameters were analyzed separately, no differences were seen in the frequency of relapse between the groups based on extent of necrosis, atypia, fibrosis, variant atypia, variant syncytia, eosinophilia, or number of mitoses. Conclusions. The histologic subclassification of Hodgkin's disease had no prognostic significance in this group of surgically staged, uniformly treated patients.

KW - histologic subclassification

KW - Hodgkin's disease

KW - laparotomy

KW - nodular sclerosis

KW - prognosis

KW - radiation therapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028363275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028363275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/1097-0142(19940715)74:2<708::AID-CNCR2820740226>3.0.CO;2-7

DO - 10.1002/1097-0142(19940715)74:2<708::AID-CNCR2820740226>3.0.CO;2-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 8033052

AN - SCOPUS:0028363275

VL - 74

SP - 708

EP - 714

JO - Cancer

JF - Cancer

SN - 0008-543X

IS - 2

ER -