History of Severe Sunburn and Risk of Skin Cancer among Women and Men in 2 Prospective Cohort Studies

Shaowei Wu, Eunyoung Cho, Wen Qing Li, Martin A. Weinstock, Jiali Han, Abrar A. Qureshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have assessed the relationship between sunburn and risk of different skin cancers (melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC)) in prospective studies simultaneously, and little is known about the association of severe sunburns at different body sites with skin cancer risk. We used data on 87,166 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1982-2010) and 32,959 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1992-2010) to investigate skin cancer risk associated with history of severe sunburns at different body sites (face/arms, trunk, and lower limbs). After adjustment for other risk factors, overall baseline history of severe sunburn was more apparently associated with risk of melanoma than with risk of SCC and BCC in men (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 2.41 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 4.41) for melanoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.03) for SCC, and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.32) for BCC) but not in women. Sunburn on the trunk appeared to be more closely associated with melanoma risk, but not risk of SCC and BCC, when compared with sunburns at other body sites (face/arms and lower limbs). These differences were more apparent in men than in women. Pending further investigation, our findings add novel insights to the existing literature on sunburn history and skin cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-833
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume183
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Sunburn
Skin Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
Confidence Intervals
Lower Extremity
Arm
Men's Health
Nurses
Health

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • melanoma
  • skin cancer
  • sun exposure
  • sunburn

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

History of Severe Sunburn and Risk of Skin Cancer among Women and Men in 2 Prospective Cohort Studies. / Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Li, Wen Qing; Weinstock, Martin A.; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 183, No. 9, 01.05.2016, p. 824-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Shaowei ; Cho, Eunyoung ; Li, Wen Qing ; Weinstock, Martin A. ; Han, Jiali ; Qureshi, Abrar A. / History of Severe Sunburn and Risk of Skin Cancer among Women and Men in 2 Prospective Cohort Studies. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2016 ; Vol. 183, No. 9. pp. 824-833.
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