Hospital IT adoption strategies associated with implementation success: implications for achieving meaningful use.

Eric W. Ford, Nir Menachemi, Timothy R. Huerta, Feliciano Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Health systems are facing significant pressure to either implement health information technology (HIT) systems that have "certified" electronic health record applications and that fulfill the federal government's definition of "meaningful use" or risk substantial financial penalties in the near future. To this end, hospitals have adopted one of three strategies, described as "best of breed," "best of suite," and "single vendor," to meet organizational and regulatory demands. The single-vendor strategy is used by the simple majority of U.S. hospitals, but is it the most effective mode for achieving full implementation? Moreover, what are the implications of adopting this strategy for achieving meaningful use? The simple answer to the first question is that the hospitals using the hybrid best of suite strategy had fully implemented HIT systems in significantly greater proportions than did hospitals employing either of the other strategies. Nonprofit and system-affiliated hospitals were more likely to have fully implemented their HIT systems. In addition, increased health maintenance organization market penetration rates were positively correlated with complete implementation rates. These results have ongoing implications for achieving meaningful use in the near term. The federal government's rewards and incentives program related to the meaningful use of HIT in hospitals has created an organizational imperative to implement such systems. For hospitals that have not begun systemwide implementation, pursuing a best of suite strategy may provide the greatest chance for achieving all or some of the meaningful use targets in the near term or at least avoiding future penalties scheduled to begin in 2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of healthcare management / American College of Healthcare Executives
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Informatics
Health Information Systems
Federal Government
Health Maintenance Organizations
Electronic Health Records
IT adoption
Reward
Motivation
Pressure
Health information technology
Health
Technology system
Penalty
Federal government
Vendors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health Policy
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Hospital IT adoption strategies associated with implementation success : implications for achieving meaningful use. / Ford, Eric W.; Menachemi, Nir; Huerta, Timothy R.; Yu, Feliciano.

In: Journal of healthcare management / American College of Healthcare Executives, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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