Hot flashes, core body temperature, and metabolic parameters in breast cancer survivors

Janet S. Carpenter, Janet M. Gilchrist, Kong Chen, Shiva Gautam, Robert R. Freedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine core body temperature, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient among breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes and compare these data to published studies from healthy women. Design: In an observational study, nine breast cancer survivors with daily hot flashes who met specified criteria spent 24 hours in a temperature- and humidity-controlled whole-room indirect calorimeter (ie, metabolic room). Demographic and disease/treatment information were obtained and the following were measured: hot flashes via sternal skin conductance monitoring (sampled every second); core body temperature via an ingested radiotelemetry pill (sampled every 10 seconds); and energy expenditure and respiratory quotient via a whole-room indirect calorimeter (calculated every minute). Results: Circadian analysis of core temperature indicated wide variability with disrupted circadian rhythm noted in all women. Core temperature began to rise 20 minutes pre-flash to 7 minutes pre-flash (0.09°C increase). Increases in energy expenditure and respiratory quotient increased with each hot flash. Conclusions: Findings are comparable to published data from healthy women and warrant replication in larger, more diverse samples of women treated for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalMenopause
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Fingerprint

Hot Flashes
Body Temperature
Survivors
Energy Metabolism
Breast Neoplasms
Temperature
Circadian Rhythm
Humidity
Observational Studies
Demography
Skin

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Core temperature
  • Energy expenditure
  • Hot flashes
  • Metabolism
  • Respiratory quotient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Hot flashes, core body temperature, and metabolic parameters in breast cancer survivors. / Carpenter, Janet S.; Gilchrist, Janet M.; Chen, Kong; Gautam, Shiva; Freedman, Robert R.

In: Menopause, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.12.2004, p. 375-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carpenter, Janet S. ; Gilchrist, Janet M. ; Chen, Kong ; Gautam, Shiva ; Freedman, Robert R. / Hot flashes, core body temperature, and metabolic parameters in breast cancer survivors. In: Menopause. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 375-381.
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