How beneficial is the use of NSAIDs in stem-cell transplantation?

Jonathan Hoggatt, Louis Pelus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

For a number of malignant hematologic diseases, including leukemias, lymphomas and myelomas, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative option. The stem cell sources for these life-saving transplants come from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, or from the peripheral blood of patients or donors treated with mobilizing agents. Recently, the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin, ibuprofen and meloxicam has been reported to enhance the ability to acquire stem cells from mobilized peripheral blood, resulting in a superior stem cell graft. The addition of NSAIDs, notably meloxicam, to current mobilization strategies is convenient, cost effective, and given the long track record of NSAID use, presumably safe. This article discusses the potential to translate these findings to clinical practice and addresses unanswered questions regarding the use of NSAIDs in stem cell transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2453-2456
Number of pages4
JournalExpert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Volume14
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

meloxicam
Stem Cell Transplantation
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Stem Cells
Transplants
Hematologic Diseases
Ibuprofen
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Fetal Blood
Aspirin
Lymphoma
Leukemia
Bone Marrow
Tissue Donors
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Hematopoiesis
  • Mobilization
  • NSAID
  • Stem cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

How beneficial is the use of NSAIDs in stem-cell transplantation? / Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis.

In: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 14, No. 18, 12.2013, p. 2453-2456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoggatt, Jonathan ; Pelus, Louis. / How beneficial is the use of NSAIDs in stem-cell transplantation?. In: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 18. pp. 2453-2456.
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