How do adolescents view health? Implications for state health policy

Mary Ott, Joshua G. Rosenberger, Kimberly R. McBride, Stephanie G. Woodcox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Policy-makers rarely consult adolescents during development of health policies. However, perspectives of adolescents on health can inform public health policies and programs. As part of the development of an Indiana state plan for adolescent health, we used qualitative methods to describe adolescents' "emic" views of health, and discuss implications for a state health policy for youth. Patients and Methods: We conducted eight adolescent focus groups in geographically and culturally diverse regions of Indiana. Each group was audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Results: Participants described health as a shared responsibility between adolescents and adults in their lives. They identified a key role for supportive adults in initiating and maintaining health behaviors. Physical, financial, and informational environments could support or hinder healthy behaviors and outcomes. Although adolescents' descriptions of physical health and risk behaviors were similar to adult formulations, they described mental health as "stress and fatigue," an interaction between the adolescent and their environment, rather than depression and anxiety which are considered to be individual pathologies. Respect for decision-making capacity, seeking adolescent input, and providing harm reduction messages were identified as particularly important. Conclusions: Adolescent's perception of health can inform policies and programs, and should be sought before the development of health policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)398-403
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Health Policy
Health Behavior
Harm Reduction
Adolescent Development
Health
Public Policy
Risk-Taking
Adolescent Health
Focus Groups
Administrative Personnel
Fatigue
Decision Making
Mental Health
Anxiety
Public Health
Depression
Pathology

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Focus groups
  • Health policy
  • Mental health
  • Qualitative research
  • States
  • Youth development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

How do adolescents view health? Implications for state health policy. / Ott, Mary; Rosenberger, Joshua G.; McBride, Kimberly R.; Woodcox, Stephanie G.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 48, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 398-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ott, Mary ; Rosenberger, Joshua G. ; McBride, Kimberly R. ; Woodcox, Stephanie G. / How do adolescents view health? Implications for state health policy. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2011 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 398-403.
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