How managed care plans contribute to public health practice

G. P. Mays, Paul Halverson, A. D. Kaluzny, E. C. Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growth in managed care enrollment potentially creates incentives for health plans to become involved in public health activities, such as health promotion and disease prevention interventions, and care for vulnerable populations. Using cross-sectional data from 60 diverse markets, this study explores the extent to which health maintenance organizations (HMOs) form cooperative alliances with local public health agencies to perform such activities. Results from multivariate models suggest that the incentives for cooperation vary substantially with health plan ownership and market structure. In view of recent HMO industry trends, these findings raise questions about the ability of alliances to integrate the practice of public health and medicine on a broad national scale, as some proponents suggest they do.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-410
Number of pages22
JournalInquiry
Volume37
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Health Practice
Health Maintenance Organizations
Managed Care Programs
Motivation
Public Health
Aptitude
Ownership
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Health Promotion
Industry
Medicine
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Mays, G. P., Halverson, P., Kaluzny, A. D., & Norton, E. C. (2000). How managed care plans contribute to public health practice. Inquiry, 37(4), 389-410.

How managed care plans contribute to public health practice. / Mays, G. P.; Halverson, Paul; Kaluzny, A. D.; Norton, E. C.

In: Inquiry, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.12.2000, p. 389-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mays, GP, Halverson, P, Kaluzny, AD & Norton, EC 2000, 'How managed care plans contribute to public health practice', Inquiry, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 389-410.
Mays GP, Halverson P, Kaluzny AD, Norton EC. How managed care plans contribute to public health practice. Inquiry. 2000 Dec 1;37(4):389-410.
Mays, G. P. ; Halverson, Paul ; Kaluzny, A. D. ; Norton, E. C. / How managed care plans contribute to public health practice. In: Inquiry. 2000 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 389-410.
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