How old is too old? In vivo engraftment of human peripheral bloodstem cells cryopreserved for up to 18 years - implications for clinical transplantation and stability programs

John Underwood, Mahvish Rahim, Carijo West, Rebecca Britton, Elaine Skipworth, Vicki Graves, Steven Sexton, Hillary Harris, Dave Schwering, Anthony Sinn, Karen E. Pollok, Kent A. Robertson, W. Scott Goebel, Kerry M. Hege

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

use for hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Long term cryopreservation is commonly defined as five years or longer, and limited data exists regarding how long PBSC can be cryopreserved and retain the ability to successfully engraft. Clinical programs, stem cell banks, and regulatory and accrediting agencies interested in product stability would benefit from such data. Thus, we assessed recovery and colony forming ability of PBSC following long-term cryopreservation as well as their ability to engraft in NOD/SCID/IL-2R?null (NSG) mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-367
Number of pages9
JournalWorld Journal of Stem Cells
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 26 2020

Keywords

  • Colony-forming units assay
  • Cryopreservation
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Hematopoietic stem cells
  • In vitro techniques
  • Long-term storage
  • Peripheral blood stem cell
  • Transplant
  • Viability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cell Biology

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