HPV.edu study protocol: A cluster randomised controlled evaluation of education, decisional support and logistical strategies in school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents

S. Rachel Skinner, Cristyn Davies, Spring Cooper, Tanya Stoney, Helen Marshall, Jane Jones, Joanne Collins, Heidi Hutton, Adriana Parrella, Gregory Zimet, David G. Regan, Patti Whyte, Julia M L Brotherton, Peter Richmond, Kirsten McCaffrey, Suzanne M. Garland, Julie Leask, Melissa Kang, Annette Braunack-Mayer, John KaldorKevin McGeechan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program in Australia commenced in 2007 for females and in 2013 for males, using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV 6,11,16,18). Thus far, we have demonstrated very substantial reductions in genital warts and in the prevalence of HPV among young Australian women, providing early evidence for the success of this public health initiative. Australia has a long history of school-based vaccination programs for adolescents, with comparatively high coverage. However, it is not clear what factors promote success in a school vaccination program. The HPV.edu study aims to examine: 1) student knowledge about HPV vaccination; 2) psycho-social outcomes and 3) vaccination uptake. Methods/Design: HPV.edu is a cluster randomised trial of a complex intervention in schools aiming to recruit 40 schools with year-8 enrolments above 100 students (approximately 4400 students). The schools will be stratified by Government, Catholic, and Independent sectors and geographical location, with up to 20 schools recruited in each of two states, Western Australia (WA) and South Australia (SA), and randomly allocated to intervention or control (usual practice). Intervention schools will receive the complex intervention which includes an adolescent intervention (education and distraction); a decisional support tool for parents and adolescents and logistical strategies (consent form returns strategies, in-school mop-up vaccination and vaccination-day guidelines). Careful process evaluation including an embedded qualitative evaluation will be undertaken to explore in depth possible mechanisms for any observed effect of the intervention on primary and secondary outcomes. Discussion: This study is the first to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various strategies to promote best practice in school-based vaccination against HPV. The study aims to improve vaccination-related psychosocial outcomes, including adolescent knowledge and attitudes, decision-making involvement, self-efficacy, and to reduce fear and anxiety. The study also aims to improve school vaccination program logistics including reduction in time spent vaccinating adolescents and increased number of consent forms returned (regardless of decision). Less anxiety in adolescents will likely promote more efficient vaccination, which will be more acceptable to teachers, nurses and parents. Through these interventions, it is hoped that vaccination uptake will be increased. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12614000404628, 14.04.2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2168
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2015

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Vaccination
Education
Consent Forms
Students
Anxiety
Parents
Human papillomavirus 11
Human papillomavirus 6
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Condylomata Acuminata
Western Australia
South Australia
Self Efficacy
New Zealand
Practice Guidelines
Fear
Registries
Decision Making
Public Health
Nurses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

HPV.edu study protocol : A cluster randomised controlled evaluation of education, decisional support and logistical strategies in school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents. / Skinner, S. Rachel; Davies, Cristyn; Cooper, Spring; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen; Jones, Jane; Collins, Joanne; Hutton, Heidi; Parrella, Adriana; Zimet, Gregory; Regan, David G.; Whyte, Patti; Brotherton, Julia M L; Richmond, Peter; McCaffrey, Kirsten; Garland, Suzanne M.; Leask, Julie; Kang, Melissa; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Kaldor, John; McGeechan, Kevin.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2168, 15.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skinner, SR, Davies, C, Cooper, S, Stoney, T, Marshall, H, Jones, J, Collins, J, Hutton, H, Parrella, A, Zimet, G, Regan, DG, Whyte, P, Brotherton, JML, Richmond, P, McCaffrey, K, Garland, SM, Leask, J, Kang, M, Braunack-Mayer, A, Kaldor, J & McGeechan, K 2015, 'HPV.edu study protocol: A cluster randomised controlled evaluation of education, decisional support and logistical strategies in school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents', BMC Public Health, vol. 15, no. 1, 2168. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2168-5
Skinner, S. Rachel ; Davies, Cristyn ; Cooper, Spring ; Stoney, Tanya ; Marshall, Helen ; Jones, Jane ; Collins, Joanne ; Hutton, Heidi ; Parrella, Adriana ; Zimet, Gregory ; Regan, David G. ; Whyte, Patti ; Brotherton, Julia M L ; Richmond, Peter ; McCaffrey, Kirsten ; Garland, Suzanne M. ; Leask, Julie ; Kang, Melissa ; Braunack-Mayer, Annette ; Kaldor, John ; McGeechan, Kevin. / HPV.edu study protocol : A cluster randomised controlled evaluation of education, decisional support and logistical strategies in school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents. In: BMC Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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