Human and macaque mastication: A quantitative study

Kenneth Byrd, D. J. Milberg, E. S. Luschei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significant differences exist between human and Macaca fascicularis patterns of mandibular movement during mastication. Macaque patterns display less asymmetry, more uniformity, and limited lateral excursions when compared to humans for mastication of the same food. Different anatomical structures between the two species offer explanations of the different patterns that were observed. Researchers should use caution when using macaques as models for human mastication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)834-843
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume57
Issue number7-8
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mastication
Macaca
Macaca fascicularis
Research Personnel
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Byrd, K., Milberg, D. J., & Luschei, E. S. (1978). Human and macaque mastication: A quantitative study. Journal of Dental Research, 57(7-8), 834-843.

Human and macaque mastication : A quantitative study. / Byrd, Kenneth; Milberg, D. J.; Luschei, E. S.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 57, No. 7-8, 1978, p. 834-843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Byrd, K, Milberg, DJ & Luschei, ES 1978, 'Human and macaque mastication: A quantitative study', Journal of Dental Research, vol. 57, no. 7-8, pp. 834-843.
Byrd, Kenneth ; Milberg, D. J. ; Luschei, E. S. / Human and macaque mastication : A quantitative study. In: Journal of Dental Research. 1978 ; Vol. 57, No. 7-8. pp. 834-843.
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