Hypophosphatemic rickets

Revealing novel control points for phosphate homeostasis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid and somewhat surprising advances have recently been made toward understanding the molecular mechanisms causing heritable disorders of hypophosphatemia. The results of clinical, genetic, and translational studies have interwoven novel concepts underlying the endocrine control of phosphate metabolism, with far-reaching implications for treatment of both rare Mendelian diseases as well as common disorders of blood phosphate excess such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). In particular, diseases caused by changes in the expression and proteolytic control of the phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) have come to the forefront in terms of directing new models explaining mineral metabolism. These hypophosphatemic disorders as well as others resulting from independent defects in phosphate transport or metabolism will be reviewed herein, and implications for emerging therapeutic strategies based upon these new findings will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-262
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Hypophosphatemic Rickets
Homeostasis
Phosphates
Hypophosphatemia
Rare Diseases
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Minerals
Hormones
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • DMP1
  • ENPP1
  • Fam20c
  • FGF23
  • Furin
  • GALNT3
  • Hyperphosphatemia
  • Hypophosphatemia
  • Mineralization
  • Osteomalacia
  • Phosphate
  • Rickets
  • αKlotho

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hypophosphatemic rickets : Revealing novel control points for phosphate homeostasis. / White, Kenneth; Hum, Julia M.; Econs, Michael.

In: Current Osteoporosis Reports, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2014, p. 252-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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