Ibudilast reduces alcohol drinking in multiple animal models of alcohol dependence

Richard Bell, Marcelo F. Lopez, Changhai Cui, Mark Egli, Kirk W. Johnson, Kelle M. Franklin, Howard C. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuroinflammatory signaling pathways in the central nervous system are of current interest as potential pharmacotherapy targets for alcohol dependence. In this study, we examined the ability of ibudilast, a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, to reduce alcohol drinking and relapse in alcohol-preferring P rats, high-alcohol drinking HAD1 rats, and in mice made dependent on alcohol through cycles of alcohol vapor exposure. When administered twice daily, ibudilast reduced alcohol drinking in rats by approximately 50% and reduced drinking by alcohol-dependent mice at doses which had no effect in non-dependent mice. These findings support the viability of ibudilast as a possible treatment for alcohol dependence. In this study, we examined the ability of ibudilast, a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, to reduce alcohol drinking and relapse in alcohol-preferring P rats, high-alcohol drinking HAD1 rats, and in mice made dependent on alcohol through cycles of alcohol vapor exposure. When administered twice daily, ibudilast reduced alcohol drinking in rats by approximately 50% and reduced drinking by alcohol dependent mice at doses which had no effect in non-dependent mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism
Animal Models
Alcohols
Aptitude
Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors
Recurrence
ibudilast
Central Nervous System
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • alcohol dependence
  • alcohol preference
  • alcoholism
  • AV-411
  • ethanol
  • ibudilast
  • MN-166
  • neuroimmune
  • phosphodiesterase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Bell, R., Lopez, M. F., Cui, C., Egli, M., Johnson, K. W., Franklin, K. M., & Becker, H. C. (2015). Ibudilast reduces alcohol drinking in multiple animal models of alcohol dependence. Addiction Biology, 20(1), 38-42. https://doi.org/10.1111/adb.12106

Ibudilast reduces alcohol drinking in multiple animal models of alcohol dependence. / Bell, Richard; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Cui, Changhai; Egli, Mark; Johnson, Kirk W.; Franklin, Kelle M.; Becker, Howard C.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, R, Lopez, MF, Cui, C, Egli, M, Johnson, KW, Franklin, KM & Becker, HC 2015, 'Ibudilast reduces alcohol drinking in multiple animal models of alcohol dependence', Addiction Biology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 38-42. https://doi.org/10.1111/adb.12106
Bell, Richard ; Lopez, Marcelo F. ; Cui, Changhai ; Egli, Mark ; Johnson, Kirk W. ; Franklin, Kelle M. ; Becker, Howard C. / Ibudilast reduces alcohol drinking in multiple animal models of alcohol dependence. In: Addiction Biology. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 38-42.
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