Ictal propagation of high frequency activity is recapitulated in interictal recordings: Effective connectivity of epileptogenic networks recorded with intracranial EEG

A. Korzeniewska, M. C. Cervenka, C. C. Jouny, J. R. Perilla, Jaroslaw Harezlak, G. K. Bergey, P. J. Franaszczuk, N. E. Crone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Seizures are increasingly understood to arise from epileptogenic networks across which ictal activity is propagated and sustained. In patients undergoing invasive monitoring for epilepsy surgery, high frequency oscillations have been observed within the seizure onset zone during both ictal and interictal intervals. We hypothesized that the patterns by which high frequency activity is propagated would help elucidate epileptogenic networks and thereby identify network nodes relevant for surgical planning. Intracranial EEG recordings were analyzed with a multivariate autoregressive modeling technique (short-time direct directed transfer function-SdDTF), based on the concept of Granger causality, to estimate the directionality and intensity of propagation of high frequency activity (70-175. Hz) during ictal and interictal recordings. These analyses revealed prominent divergence and convergence of high frequency activity propagation at sites identified by epileptologists as part of the ictal onset zone. In contrast, relatively little propagation of this activity was observed among the other analyzed sites. This pattern was observed in both subdural and depth electrode recordings of patients with focal ictal onset, but not in patients with a widely distributed ictal onset. In patients with focal ictal onsets, the patterns of propagation recorded during pre-ictal (up to 5. min immediately preceding ictal onset) and interictal (more than 24. h before and after seizures) intervals were very similar to those recorded during seizures. The ability to characterize epileptogenic networks from interictal recordings could have important clinical implications for epilepsy surgery planning by reducing the need for prolonged invasive monitoring to record spontaneous seizures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-113
Number of pages18
JournalNeuroImage
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Stroke
Seizures
Epilepsy
Electrocorticography
Causality
Electrodes

Keywords

  • Brain mapping
  • ECoG
  • Epilepsy surgery
  • Epileptic network
  • High frequency oscillations (HFOs)
  • Seizure onset zone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ictal propagation of high frequency activity is recapitulated in interictal recordings : Effective connectivity of epileptogenic networks recorded with intracranial EEG. / Korzeniewska, A.; Cervenka, M. C.; Jouny, C. C.; Perilla, J. R.; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Bergey, G. K.; Franaszczuk, P. J.; Crone, N. E.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 101, 01.11.2014, p. 96-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korzeniewska, A. ; Cervenka, M. C. ; Jouny, C. C. ; Perilla, J. R. ; Harezlak, Jaroslaw ; Bergey, G. K. ; Franaszczuk, P. J. ; Crone, N. E. / Ictal propagation of high frequency activity is recapitulated in interictal recordings : Effective connectivity of epileptogenic networks recorded with intracranial EEG. In: NeuroImage. 2014 ; Vol. 101. pp. 96-113.
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