Identification and functional evaluation of cellular and viral factors involved in the alteration of nuclear architecture during herpes simplex virus 1 infection

Martha Simpson-Holley, Robert C. Colgrove, Grzegorz Nalepa, J. Wade Harper, David M. Knipe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicates in the nucleus of host cells and radically alters nuclear architecture as part of its replication process. Replication compartments (RCs) form, and host chromatin is marginalized. Chromatin is later dispersed, and RCs spread past it to reach the nuclear edge. Using a lamin A-green fluorescent protein fusion, we provide direct evidence that the nuclear lamina is disrupted during HSV-1 infection and that the UL31 and UL34 proteins are required for this. We show nuclear expansion from 8 h to 24 h postinfection and place chromatin rearrangement and disruption of the lamina in the context of this global change in nuclear architecture. We show HSV-1-induced disruption of the localization of Cdc14B, a cellular protein and component of a putative nucleoskeleton. We also show that UL31 and UL34 are required for nuclear expansion. Studies with inhibitors of globular actin (G-actin) indicate that G-actin plays an essential role in nuclear expansion and chromatin dispersal but not in lamina alterations induced by HSV-1 infection. From analyses of HSV infections under various conditions, we conclude that nuclear expansion and chromatin dispersal are dispensable for optimal replication, while lamina rearrangement is associated with efficient replication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12840-12851
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of virology
Volume79
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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