Identification of quantitative trait loci influencing alcohol consumption in the high alcohol drinking and low alcohol drinking rat lines

Tatiana Foroud, Paula Bice, Peter Castelluccio, Ronghai Bo, Laurie Miller, Aimee Ritchotte, Lawrence Lumeng, Ting Kai Li, Lucinda G. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Selective breeding has been employed to develop high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD) rat lines from the heterogeneous N/Nih rat. Within-family selection and a rotational breeding design were used to discourage inbreeding (Li et al, 1993). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to alcohol consumption, reciprocal HAD and LAD matings in conjunction with F1 intercrosses were used to create 459 F2 progeny. Using selective genotyping of 151 F2 progeny with extreme alcohol consumption scores and a novel least squares method developed by Haley et al (1994), five chromosomal regions (1,5,10,12, and 16) were identified with lod scores greater than 2.0. Genotyping of the entire sample of 459 F2 progeny produced maximum lod scores of 3.5 on chromosome 5, 2.4 on chromosome 10, 4.7 on chromosome 12 and 2.9 on chromosome 16. The evidence of linkage to chromosome 1 diminished substantially to a maximum lod score of 0.5 when all F2 progeny were genotyped. This study is the first genome-wide study for QTLs underlying alcohol consumption that has employed noninbred lines. Further localization of these QTLs will likely provide insight and candidate genes for the study of human alcoholism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-140
Number of pages10
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Noninbred rat lines
  • Quantitative trait locus (QTL)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)

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