Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department

E. Melinda Mahabee-Gittens, Jacqueline Grupp-Phelan, Alan S. Brody, Lane F. Donnelly, Sheryl Allen, Elena M. Duma, Mia L. Mallory, Gail B. Slap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emergency physicians need to clinically differentiate children with and without radiographic evidence of pneumonia. In this prospective cohort study of 510 patients 2 to 59 months of age presenting with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection, 100% were evaluated with chest radiography and 44 (8.6%) had pneumonia on chest radiography. With use of multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the clinical findings significantly associated with focal infiltrates were age older than 12 months (AOR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.9), RR 50 or greater (AOR 3.5, CI 1.6-7.5), oxygen saturation 96% or less (AOR 4.6, CI 2.3-9.2), and nasal flaring (AOR 2.2 CI 1.2-4.0) in patients 12 months of age or younger. The combination of age older than 12 months, RR 50 or greater, oxygen saturation 96% or less, and in children under age 12 months, nasal flaring, can be used in determining which young children with lower respiratory tract infection symptoms have radiographic pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-435
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Hospital Emergency Service
Pneumonia
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Nose
Radiography
Respiratory Tract Infections
Thorax
Oxygen
Emergencies
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Mahabee-Gittens, E. M., Grupp-Phelan, J., Brody, A. S., Donnelly, L. F., Allen, S., Duma, E. M., ... Slap, G. B. (2005). Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department. Clinical Pediatrics, 44(5), 427-435. https://doi.org/10.1177/000992280504400508

Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department. / Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda; Grupp-Phelan, Jacqueline; Brody, Alan S.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Allen, Sheryl; Duma, Elena M.; Mallory, Mia L.; Slap, Gail B.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 44, No. 5, 06.2005, p. 427-435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mahabee-Gittens, EM, Grupp-Phelan, J, Brody, AS, Donnelly, LF, Allen, S, Duma, EM, Mallory, ML & Slap, GB 2005, 'Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 427-435. https://doi.org/10.1177/000992280504400508
Mahabee-Gittens EM, Grupp-Phelan J, Brody AS, Donnelly LF, Allen S, Duma EM et al. Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department. Clinical Pediatrics. 2005 Jun;44(5):427-435. https://doi.org/10.1177/000992280504400508
Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda ; Grupp-Phelan, Jacqueline ; Brody, Alan S. ; Donnelly, Lane F. ; Allen, Sheryl ; Duma, Elena M. ; Mallory, Mia L. ; Slap, Gail B. / Identifying children with pneumonia in the emergency department. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 44, No. 5. pp. 427-435.
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