Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease: Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography?

D. D.T. Maglinte, R. L. Hallett, D. Rex, G. T. Chua, F. M. Kelvin, B. Harmon, J. Lappas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To analyze imaging features and compare the diagnostic information provided by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and enteroclysis to see whether CT can replace barium examinations in the assessment of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Methods: The abdominal CT studies and enteroclysis of 33 patients with small bowel Crohn's disease who underwent both examinations within a 2-week time period were retrospectively reviewed and scored for the presence and severity of the following features: mural edema, ulceration, small bowel obstruction, stricture, sinus tract formation, fistula, abscess, extraintestinal manifestations, and total number of intestinal sites involved. The statistical significance of the differences for each variable was calculated. Results: A total of 37 case sets were reviewed. CT demonstrated 10 (27 %) abscesses compared to 7 (19 %) shown by enteroclysis. Three extraintestinal sites shown by CT were not demonstrated by enteroclysis. Enteroclysis detected a larger number of intestinal sites of involvement (54 vs. 47) and more cases of ulceration (78 % vs. 19 %), small bowel obstruction (46 % vs. 16 %), stricture (38 % vs. 11 %), fistula formation (24 % vs. 8 %), and sinus tract formation (27 % vs. 5 %). The two modalities were similar in characterizing and grading the severity of mural thickening (CT showed 41 %, enteroclysis 46 %). Conclusion: Abdominal CT and enteroclysis provide unique and complementary diagnostic information in patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel. Both methods may be required for the accurate assessment of the severity and extent of Crohn's disease of the small bowel. The choice of initial examination will depend on the clinical issue in question.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalEmergency Radiology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Barium
Radiography
Crohn Disease
Tomography
Abscess
Fistula
Pathologic Constriction
Edema

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease, CT
  • Crohn's disease, diagnosis
  • Crohn's disease, enteroclysis
  • Small bowel, Crohn's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Maglinte, D. D. T., Hallett, R. L., Rex, D., Chua, G. T., Kelvin, F. M., Harmon, B., & Lappas, J. (2001). Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease: Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography? Emergency Radiology, 8(3), 127-133. https://doi.org/10.1007/PL00011889

Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease : Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography? / Maglinte, D. D.T.; Hallett, R. L.; Rex, D.; Chua, G. T.; Kelvin, F. M.; Harmon, B.; Lappas, J.

In: Emergency Radiology, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 127-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maglinte, DDT, Hallett, RL, Rex, D, Chua, GT, Kelvin, FM, Harmon, B & Lappas, J 2001, 'Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease: Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography?', Emergency Radiology, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 127-133. https://doi.org/10.1007/PL00011889
Maglinte DDT, Hallett RL, Rex D, Chua GT, Kelvin FM, Harmon B et al. Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease: Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography? Emergency Radiology. 2001 Jan 1;8(3):127-133. https://doi.org/10.1007/PL00011889
Maglinte, D. D.T. ; Hallett, R. L. ; Rex, D. ; Chua, G. T. ; Kelvin, F. M. ; Harmon, B. ; Lappas, J. / Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease : Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography?. In: Emergency Radiology. 2001 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 127-133.
@article{39a7eadd70ed48d4a73c9b9299eba9c2,
title = "Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease: Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography?",
abstract = "Objectives: To analyze imaging features and compare the diagnostic information provided by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and enteroclysis to see whether CT can replace barium examinations in the assessment of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Methods: The abdominal CT studies and enteroclysis of 33 patients with small bowel Crohn's disease who underwent both examinations within a 2-week time period were retrospectively reviewed and scored for the presence and severity of the following features: mural edema, ulceration, small bowel obstruction, stricture, sinus tract formation, fistula, abscess, extraintestinal manifestations, and total number of intestinal sites involved. The statistical significance of the differences for each variable was calculated. Results: A total of 37 case sets were reviewed. CT demonstrated 10 (27 {\%}) abscesses compared to 7 (19 {\%}) shown by enteroclysis. Three extraintestinal sites shown by CT were not demonstrated by enteroclysis. Enteroclysis detected a larger number of intestinal sites of involvement (54 vs. 47) and more cases of ulceration (78 {\%} vs. 19 {\%}), small bowel obstruction (46 {\%} vs. 16 {\%}), stricture (38 {\%} vs. 11 {\%}), fistula formation (24 {\%} vs. 8 {\%}), and sinus tract formation (27 {\%} vs. 5 {\%}). The two modalities were similar in characterizing and grading the severity of mural thickening (CT showed 41 {\%}, enteroclysis 46 {\%}). Conclusion: Abdominal CT and enteroclysis provide unique and complementary diagnostic information in patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel. Both methods may be required for the accurate assessment of the severity and extent of Crohn's disease of the small bowel. The choice of initial examination will depend on the clinical issue in question.",
keywords = "Crohn's disease, CT, Crohn's disease, diagnosis, Crohn's disease, enteroclysis, Small bowel, Crohn's disease",
author = "Maglinte, {D. D.T.} and Hallett, {R. L.} and D. Rex and Chua, {G. T.} and Kelvin, {F. M.} and B. Harmon and J. Lappas",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/PL00011889",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "127--133",
journal = "Emergency Radiology",
issn = "1070-3004",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease

T2 - Can abdominal CT replace barium radiography?

AU - Maglinte, D. D.T.

AU - Hallett, R. L.

AU - Rex, D.

AU - Chua, G. T.

AU - Kelvin, F. M.

AU - Harmon, B.

AU - Lappas, J.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - Objectives: To analyze imaging features and compare the diagnostic information provided by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and enteroclysis to see whether CT can replace barium examinations in the assessment of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Methods: The abdominal CT studies and enteroclysis of 33 patients with small bowel Crohn's disease who underwent both examinations within a 2-week time period were retrospectively reviewed and scored for the presence and severity of the following features: mural edema, ulceration, small bowel obstruction, stricture, sinus tract formation, fistula, abscess, extraintestinal manifestations, and total number of intestinal sites involved. The statistical significance of the differences for each variable was calculated. Results: A total of 37 case sets were reviewed. CT demonstrated 10 (27 %) abscesses compared to 7 (19 %) shown by enteroclysis. Three extraintestinal sites shown by CT were not demonstrated by enteroclysis. Enteroclysis detected a larger number of intestinal sites of involvement (54 vs. 47) and more cases of ulceration (78 % vs. 19 %), small bowel obstruction (46 % vs. 16 %), stricture (38 % vs. 11 %), fistula formation (24 % vs. 8 %), and sinus tract formation (27 % vs. 5 %). The two modalities were similar in characterizing and grading the severity of mural thickening (CT showed 41 %, enteroclysis 46 %). Conclusion: Abdominal CT and enteroclysis provide unique and complementary diagnostic information in patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel. Both methods may be required for the accurate assessment of the severity and extent of Crohn's disease of the small bowel. The choice of initial examination will depend on the clinical issue in question.

AB - Objectives: To analyze imaging features and compare the diagnostic information provided by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and enteroclysis to see whether CT can replace barium examinations in the assessment of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Methods: The abdominal CT studies and enteroclysis of 33 patients with small bowel Crohn's disease who underwent both examinations within a 2-week time period were retrospectively reviewed and scored for the presence and severity of the following features: mural edema, ulceration, small bowel obstruction, stricture, sinus tract formation, fistula, abscess, extraintestinal manifestations, and total number of intestinal sites involved. The statistical significance of the differences for each variable was calculated. Results: A total of 37 case sets were reviewed. CT demonstrated 10 (27 %) abscesses compared to 7 (19 %) shown by enteroclysis. Three extraintestinal sites shown by CT were not demonstrated by enteroclysis. Enteroclysis detected a larger number of intestinal sites of involvement (54 vs. 47) and more cases of ulceration (78 % vs. 19 %), small bowel obstruction (46 % vs. 16 %), stricture (38 % vs. 11 %), fistula formation (24 % vs. 8 %), and sinus tract formation (27 % vs. 5 %). The two modalities were similar in characterizing and grading the severity of mural thickening (CT showed 41 %, enteroclysis 46 %). Conclusion: Abdominal CT and enteroclysis provide unique and complementary diagnostic information in patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel. Both methods may be required for the accurate assessment of the severity and extent of Crohn's disease of the small bowel. The choice of initial examination will depend on the clinical issue in question.

KW - Crohn's disease, CT

KW - Crohn's disease, diagnosis

KW - Crohn's disease, enteroclysis

KW - Small bowel, Crohn's disease

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034945527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034945527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/PL00011889

DO - 10.1007/PL00011889

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034945527

VL - 8

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - Emergency Radiology

JF - Emergency Radiology

SN - 1070-3004

IS - 3

ER -