Immature and mature megakaryocytes enhance osteoblast proliferation and inhibit osteoclast formation

Wendy A. Ciovacco, Ying Hua Cheng, Mark C. Horowitz, Melissa A. Kacena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent data suggest that megakaryocytes (MKs) play a role in skeletal homeostasis. In vitro and in vivo data show that MKs stimulate osteoblast (OB) proliferation and inhibit osteoclast (OC) formation, thus favoring net bone deposition. There are several mouse models with dysregulated megakaryopoiesis and resultant high bone mass phenotypes. One such model that our group has extensively studied is GATA-1 deficient mice. GATA-1 is a transcription factor required for normal megakaryopoiesis, and mice deficient in GATA-1 have increases in immature MK number and a striking increase in bone mass. While the increased bone mass could simply be a result of increased MK number, here we take a more in depth look at the MKs of these mice to see if there is a unique factor inherent to GATA-1 deficient MKs that favors increased bone deposition. We show that increased MK number does correspond with increased OB proliferation and decreased OC formation that stage of maturation does not alter the effect of MKs on bone cell lineages beyond the megakaryoblast stage, and that GATA-1 deficient MKs survive longer than wild-type controls. So while increased MK number in GATA-1 deficient mice likely contributes to the high bone mass phenotype, we propose that the increased longevity of this lineage also plays a role. Since GATA-1 deficient MKs live longer they are able to exert bothmore proliferative influence on OBs and more inhibitory influence on OCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)774-781
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cellular Biochemistry
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Megakaryocytes
Osteoblasts
Osteoclasts
Bone
Bone and Bones
Megakaryocyte Progenitor Cells
Transcription Factors
Cell Lineage
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • Longevity
  • Maturation
  • Megakaryocytes
  • Osteoblasts
  • Osteoclasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Immature and mature megakaryocytes enhance osteoblast proliferation and inhibit osteoclast formation. / Ciovacco, Wendy A.; Cheng, Ying Hua; Horowitz, Mark C.; Kacena, Melissa A.

In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 109, No. 4, 01.03.2010, p. 774-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ciovacco, Wendy A. ; Cheng, Ying Hua ; Horowitz, Mark C. ; Kacena, Melissa A. / Immature and mature megakaryocytes enhance osteoblast proliferation and inhibit osteoclast formation. In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 109, No. 4. pp. 774-781.
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