Immediate Discharge and Home Treatment with Rivaroxaban of Low-risk Venous Thromboembolism Diagnosed in Two U.S. Emergency Departments

A One-year Preplanned Analysis

Daren Beam, Zachary P. Kahler, Jeffrey Kline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives The study hypothesis was that a target-specific anticoagulant would allow successful home treatment of selected patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosed in two urban emergency departments (EDs). Methods A protocol was established for treating low-risk DVT or PE patients with rivaroxaban and clinic, follow-up at both 2 to 5 weeks, and 3 to 6 months. Patients were determined to be low-risk by using a modified version of the Hestia criteria, supplemented by additional criteria for patients with active cancer. Acceptable outcome rates were defined as venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence ≤ 2.1% or bleeding ≤ 9.4% during treatment. VTE recurrence required positive imaging of any VTE. The International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis definition of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding was used. Results From March 2013 through April 2014, a total of 106 patients were treated. Seventy-one (68%) had DVT, 30 (28%) had PE, and five (3%) had both, representing 51% of all DVTs and 27% of all PEs diagnosed in both EDs during the period of study. The 106 patients have been followed for a mean (±SD) of 389 (±111) days (range = 213 to 594 days). No patient had VTE recurrence, and no patient had a major or clinically relevant bleeding event while on therapy (none of the 106, 0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0% to 3.4%). However, three patients 2.8% (95% CI = 1% to 8%) had recurrent DVT after cessation of therapy. Conclusions Patients diagnosed with VTE and immediately discharged from the ED while treated with rivaroxaban had a low rate of VTE recurrence and bleeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)789-795
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Venous Thromboembolism
Hospital Emergency Service
Venous Thrombosis
Pulmonary Embolism
Hemorrhage
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Rivaroxaban
Confidence Intervals
Hemostasis
Anticoagulants
Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

@article{9bed557acf9443ada60138a29e56c34e,
title = "Immediate Discharge and Home Treatment with Rivaroxaban of Low-risk Venous Thromboembolism Diagnosed in Two U.S. Emergency Departments: A One-year Preplanned Analysis",
abstract = "Objectives The study hypothesis was that a target-specific anticoagulant would allow successful home treatment of selected patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosed in two urban emergency departments (EDs). Methods A protocol was established for treating low-risk DVT or PE patients with rivaroxaban and clinic, follow-up at both 2 to 5 weeks, and 3 to 6 months. Patients were determined to be low-risk by using a modified version of the Hestia criteria, supplemented by additional criteria for patients with active cancer. Acceptable outcome rates were defined as venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence ≤ 2.1{\%} or bleeding ≤ 9.4{\%} during treatment. VTE recurrence required positive imaging of any VTE. The International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis definition of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding was used. Results From March 2013 through April 2014, a total of 106 patients were treated. Seventy-one (68{\%}) had DVT, 30 (28{\%}) had PE, and five (3{\%}) had both, representing 51{\%} of all DVTs and 27{\%} of all PEs diagnosed in both EDs during the period of study. The 106 patients have been followed for a mean (±SD) of 389 (±111) days (range = 213 to 594 days). No patient had VTE recurrence, and no patient had a major or clinically relevant bleeding event while on therapy (none of the 106, 0{\%}, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 0{\%} to 3.4{\%}). However, three patients 2.8{\%} (95{\%} CI = 1{\%} to 8{\%}) had recurrent DVT after cessation of therapy. Conclusions Patients diagnosed with VTE and immediately discharged from the ED while treated with rivaroxaban had a low rate of VTE recurrence and bleeding.",
author = "Daren Beam and Kahler, {Zachary P.} and Jeffrey Kline",
year = "2015",
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T1 - Immediate Discharge and Home Treatment with Rivaroxaban of Low-risk Venous Thromboembolism Diagnosed in Two U.S. Emergency Departments

T2 - A One-year Preplanned Analysis

AU - Beam, Daren

AU - Kahler, Zachary P.

AU - Kline, Jeffrey

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Objectives The study hypothesis was that a target-specific anticoagulant would allow successful home treatment of selected patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosed in two urban emergency departments (EDs). Methods A protocol was established for treating low-risk DVT or PE patients with rivaroxaban and clinic, follow-up at both 2 to 5 weeks, and 3 to 6 months. Patients were determined to be low-risk by using a modified version of the Hestia criteria, supplemented by additional criteria for patients with active cancer. Acceptable outcome rates were defined as venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence ≤ 2.1% or bleeding ≤ 9.4% during treatment. VTE recurrence required positive imaging of any VTE. The International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis definition of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding was used. Results From March 2013 through April 2014, a total of 106 patients were treated. Seventy-one (68%) had DVT, 30 (28%) had PE, and five (3%) had both, representing 51% of all DVTs and 27% of all PEs diagnosed in both EDs during the period of study. The 106 patients have been followed for a mean (±SD) of 389 (±111) days (range = 213 to 594 days). No patient had VTE recurrence, and no patient had a major or clinically relevant bleeding event while on therapy (none of the 106, 0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0% to 3.4%). However, three patients 2.8% (95% CI = 1% to 8%) had recurrent DVT after cessation of therapy. Conclusions Patients diagnosed with VTE and immediately discharged from the ED while treated with rivaroxaban had a low rate of VTE recurrence and bleeding.

AB - Objectives The study hypothesis was that a target-specific anticoagulant would allow successful home treatment of selected patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosed in two urban emergency departments (EDs). Methods A protocol was established for treating low-risk DVT or PE patients with rivaroxaban and clinic, follow-up at both 2 to 5 weeks, and 3 to 6 months. Patients were determined to be low-risk by using a modified version of the Hestia criteria, supplemented by additional criteria for patients with active cancer. Acceptable outcome rates were defined as venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence ≤ 2.1% or bleeding ≤ 9.4% during treatment. VTE recurrence required positive imaging of any VTE. The International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis definition of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding was used. Results From March 2013 through April 2014, a total of 106 patients were treated. Seventy-one (68%) had DVT, 30 (28%) had PE, and five (3%) had both, representing 51% of all DVTs and 27% of all PEs diagnosed in both EDs during the period of study. The 106 patients have been followed for a mean (±SD) of 389 (±111) days (range = 213 to 594 days). No patient had VTE recurrence, and no patient had a major or clinically relevant bleeding event while on therapy (none of the 106, 0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0% to 3.4%). However, three patients 2.8% (95% CI = 1% to 8%) had recurrent DVT after cessation of therapy. Conclusions Patients diagnosed with VTE and immediately discharged from the ED while treated with rivaroxaban had a low rate of VTE recurrence and bleeding.

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