Immediate neuropsychological and behavioral benefits of computerized cognitive rehabilitation in Ugandan pediatric cerebral malaria survivors

Paul Bangirana, Bruno Giordani, Chandy C. John, Connie Page, Robert O. Opoka, Michael J. Boivin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our earlier studies on Ugandan children surviving cerebral malaria showed cognitive deficits mainly in attention and memory. We now present the first study in sub-Saharan Africa to investigate the feasibility and potential benefits of computerized cognitive rehabilitation training on neuropsychological and behavioral functioning of children surviving cerebral malaria. METHODS: A randomized trial in which 65 children admitted 45 months earlier with cerebral malaria were recruited at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. For 8 weeks, 32 of the children received weekly training sessions using Captain's Log cognitive training software and the other 33 were assigned to a nontreatment condition. Pre- and postintervention assessments were completed using CogState, a computerized neuropsychological battery, measuring visuomotor processing speed, working memory, learning, attention and psychomotor speed and the Child Behavior Checklist measuring internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and total problems. RESULTS: Preintervention scores were similar between both groups. Treatment effects were observed on visuospatial processing speed [group effect (standard error) 0.14 (0.03); p < .001], on a working memory and learning task [0.08 (0.02); p < .001], psychomotor speed [0.14 (0.07); p = .04], and on internalizing problems [-3.80 (1.56); p = .02] after controlling for age, sex, school grade, quality of the home environment, and weight for age z scores. Similar treatment effects were observed when no adjustments for the above covariates were made. CONCLUSIONS: Computerized cognitive training long after the cerebral malaria episode has immediate benefit on some neuropsychological and behavioral functions in African children. The long-term benefit of this intervention needs to be investigated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-318
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African children
  • Behavior
  • Cerebral malaria
  • Cognitive rehabilitation
  • Neuropsychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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