Immunopharmacology: Immunomodulation and immunotherapy

Mark Ballow, Robert Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunopharmacology has changed dramatically over the past 25 years. Although a variety of traditional nonspecific immunosuppressive drug therapies are available for the treatment of autoimmune disease and organ transplantation rejection, with advances in cell biology and monoclonal antibody technology, a highly specific antibody can be engineered to cell surface determinants on immune cells or tumors or to neutralize inflammatory and immune mediators from an immune response. Many of these modalities are still in early phases of study for the treatment of autoimmune disease. In addition to therapies that suppress immune responses, advances in molecular biology have led to new agents and methods to enhance immune responses and correct immune deficits, such as growth factor replacement and cytokine therapies. Finally, gene therapy is a method for the long-term treatment of disorders in which a defective gene leads to disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2008-2017
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume278
Issue number22
StatePublished - Dec 10 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Immunomodulation
Immunotherapy
Autoimmune Diseases
Therapeutics
Graft Rejection
Organ Transplantation
Immunosuppressive Agents
Genetic Therapy
Cell Biology
Molecular Biology
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Monoclonal Antibodies
Cytokines
Technology
Drug Therapy
Antibodies
Genes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Immunopharmacology : Immunomodulation and immunotherapy. / Ballow, Mark; Nelson, Robert.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 278, No. 22, 10.12.1997, p. 2008-2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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