Impact of a competency-based curriculum on medical student advancement

A ten-year analysis

James J. Brokaw, Laura J. Torbeck, Mary A. Bell, Dennis W. Deal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In 1999, the Indiana University School of Medicine implemented a new curriculum based on the attainment of core competencies beyond medical knowledge. Purpose: The objective was to document how the Student Promotions Committee (SPC) has adjudicated students' competency-related deficiencies over the past decade. Methods: Using SPC records, the authors determined the frequency of competency-related deficiencies reported to the SPC over time, the nature of those deficiencies, and how the deficiencies were remediated. For the purposes of this study, traditional knowledge-related deficiencies like course failures were excluded from analysis. Results: From 1999 to 2009, 191 students (138 male, 53 female) were referred to the SPC for competency-related deficiencies in 8 performance domains involving communication, basic clinical skills, lifelong learning, self-awareness, social context, ethics, problem solving, and professionalism. By comparison, 1,090 students were referred to the SPC for knowledge-related deficiencies during this time. Collectively, the 191 students were cited for 317 separate competency-related deficiencies (M ± SD = 1.7 ± 1.3; range = 1-10). Of these 317 deficiencies, the most prevalent were in the competencies of professionalism (29.3%), basic clinical skills (28.4%), and self-awareness (17.7%). Each of the remaining competencies constituted less than 10% of the total. Successful remediation utilized 12 methods ranging from a simple warning letter to repeating the year under close monitoring. Remediation was unsuccessful for 17 students (8.9%) who were dismissed from medical school primarily due to unprofessional behaviors and poor self-awareness. Conclusions: Competency-related deficiencies can be identified and remediated in most cases, but deficiencies in professionalism and self-awareness are especially challenging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-214
Number of pages8
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Medical Students
Curriculum
medical student
Students
curriculum
self awareness
promotion
student
Clinical Competence
Professional Misconduct
lifelong learning
Medical Schools
Ethics
school
Communication
moral philosophy
Medicine
Learning
medicine
monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Impact of a competency-based curriculum on medical student advancement : A ten-year analysis. / Brokaw, James J.; Torbeck, Laura J.; Bell, Mary A.; Deal, Dennis W.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 3, 2011, p. 207-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brokaw, James J. ; Torbeck, Laura J. ; Bell, Mary A. ; Deal, Dennis W. / Impact of a competency-based curriculum on medical student advancement : A ten-year analysis. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 207-214.
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