Impact of Diabetes on the Symptoms of Breast Cancer Survivors

Susan Storey, Andrea Cohee, Wambui G. Gathirua-Mwangi, Eric Vachon, Patrick Monahan, Julie Otte, Timothy E. Stump, David Cella, Victoria Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of diabetes on the symptoms of women with breast cancer. SAMPLE & SETTING: 121 women with breast cancer who self-identified as having a diabetes diagnosis and 1,006 women with breast cancer without diabetes from 97 sites across the United States. METHODS & VARIABLES: Symptom scores for depression, anxiety, sexual function, peripheral neuropathy, physical function, attention function, sleep disturbance, and fatigue were compared between women with breast cancer and diabetes and women with breast cancer without diabetes, controlling for age, education, income, marital status, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Women with breast cancer and diabetes who were three to eight years postdiagnosis reported poorer physical and attention function, more sleep disturbance, and greater fatigue than women with breast cancer without diabetes. Age, education, income, and BMI were independent predictors of symptoms experienced by women with breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses can assess and monitor women with breast cancer and diabetes for increased post-treatment sequelae. If problematic symptoms are identified, implementing treatment plans can decrease symptom burden and increase quality of life for women with breast cancer and diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-484
Number of pages12
JournalOncology nursing forum
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Survivors
Breast Neoplasms
Adenosine Monophosphate
Fatigue
Sleep
Body Mass Index
Education
Marital Status
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Anxiety
Nurses
Quality of Life
Depression
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breast cancer survivors
  • diabetes
  • quality of life
  • symptom burden

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Impact of Diabetes on the Symptoms of Breast Cancer Survivors. / Storey, Susan; Cohee, Andrea; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G.; Vachon, Eric; Monahan, Patrick; Otte, Julie; Stump, Timothy E.; Cella, David; Champion, Victoria.

In: Oncology nursing forum, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.07.2019, p. 473-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Storey, Susan ; Cohee, Andrea ; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G. ; Vachon, Eric ; Monahan, Patrick ; Otte, Julie ; Stump, Timothy E. ; Cella, David ; Champion, Victoria. / Impact of Diabetes on the Symptoms of Breast Cancer Survivors. In: Oncology nursing forum. 2019 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 473-484.
@article{16b19f46fa7245309c7ea3779eae6dce,
title = "Impact of Diabetes on the Symptoms of Breast Cancer Survivors",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of diabetes on the symptoms of women with breast cancer. SAMPLE & SETTING: 121 women with breast cancer who self-identified as having a diabetes diagnosis and 1,006 women with breast cancer without diabetes from 97 sites across the United States. METHODS & VARIABLES: Symptom scores for depression, anxiety, sexual function, peripheral neuropathy, physical function, attention function, sleep disturbance, and fatigue were compared between women with breast cancer and diabetes and women with breast cancer without diabetes, controlling for age, education, income, marital status, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Women with breast cancer and diabetes who were three to eight years postdiagnosis reported poorer physical and attention function, more sleep disturbance, and greater fatigue than women with breast cancer without diabetes. Age, education, income, and BMI were independent predictors of symptoms experienced by women with breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses can assess and monitor women with breast cancer and diabetes for increased post-treatment sequelae. If problematic symptoms are identified, implementing treatment plans can decrease symptom burden and increase quality of life for women with breast cancer and diabetes.",
keywords = "breast cancer survivors, diabetes, quality of life, symptom burden",
author = "Susan Storey and Andrea Cohee and Gathirua-Mwangi, {Wambui G.} and Eric Vachon and Patrick Monahan and Julie Otte and Stump, {Timothy E.} and David Cella and Victoria Champion",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1188/19.ONF.473-484",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "473--484",
journal = "Oncology Nursing Forum",
issn = "1538-0688",
publisher = "Oncology Nursing Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of Diabetes on the Symptoms of Breast Cancer Survivors

AU - Storey, Susan

AU - Cohee, Andrea

AU - Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G.

AU - Vachon, Eric

AU - Monahan, Patrick

AU - Otte, Julie

AU - Stump, Timothy E.

AU - Cella, David

AU - Champion, Victoria

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of diabetes on the symptoms of women with breast cancer. SAMPLE & SETTING: 121 women with breast cancer who self-identified as having a diabetes diagnosis and 1,006 women with breast cancer without diabetes from 97 sites across the United States. METHODS & VARIABLES: Symptom scores for depression, anxiety, sexual function, peripheral neuropathy, physical function, attention function, sleep disturbance, and fatigue were compared between women with breast cancer and diabetes and women with breast cancer without diabetes, controlling for age, education, income, marital status, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Women with breast cancer and diabetes who were three to eight years postdiagnosis reported poorer physical and attention function, more sleep disturbance, and greater fatigue than women with breast cancer without diabetes. Age, education, income, and BMI were independent predictors of symptoms experienced by women with breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses can assess and monitor women with breast cancer and diabetes for increased post-treatment sequelae. If problematic symptoms are identified, implementing treatment plans can decrease symptom burden and increase quality of life for women with breast cancer and diabetes.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of diabetes on the symptoms of women with breast cancer. SAMPLE & SETTING: 121 women with breast cancer who self-identified as having a diabetes diagnosis and 1,006 women with breast cancer without diabetes from 97 sites across the United States. METHODS & VARIABLES: Symptom scores for depression, anxiety, sexual function, peripheral neuropathy, physical function, attention function, sleep disturbance, and fatigue were compared between women with breast cancer and diabetes and women with breast cancer without diabetes, controlling for age, education, income, marital status, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Women with breast cancer and diabetes who were three to eight years postdiagnosis reported poorer physical and attention function, more sleep disturbance, and greater fatigue than women with breast cancer without diabetes. Age, education, income, and BMI were independent predictors of symptoms experienced by women with breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses can assess and monitor women with breast cancer and diabetes for increased post-treatment sequelae. If problematic symptoms are identified, implementing treatment plans can decrease symptom burden and increase quality of life for women with breast cancer and diabetes.

KW - breast cancer survivors

KW - diabetes

KW - quality of life

KW - symptom burden

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068490106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068490106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1188/19.ONF.473-484

DO - 10.1188/19.ONF.473-484

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 473

EP - 484

JO - Oncology Nursing Forum

JF - Oncology Nursing Forum

SN - 1538-0688

IS - 4

ER -