Impact of modeled microgravity on migration, differentiation, and cell cycle control of primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells

P. Artur Plett, Rafat Abonour, Stacy M. Frankovitz, Christie Orschell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are important factors in maintaining hematopoietic homeostasis. Homeostatic control of erythrocytes and lymphocytes is perturbed in humans exposed to microgravity (μ-g), resulting in space flight-induced anemia and immunosuppression. We sought to determine whether any of these anomalies can be explained by μ-g-induced changes in migration, proliferation, and differentiation of human BM CD34 + cells, and whether such changes can begin to explain any of the shifts in hematopoietic homeostasis observed in astronauts.BM CD34 + cells were cultured in modeled μ-g (mμ-g) using NASA's rotating wall vessels (RWV), or in control cultures at earth gravity for 2 to 18 days. Cells were harvested at different times and CD34 + cells assessed for migration potential, cell-cycle kinetics and regulatory proteins, and maturation status.Culture of BM CD34 + cells in RWV for 2 to 3 days resulted in a significant reduction of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1α)-directed migration, which correlated with decreased expression of F-actin. Modeled μ-g induced alterations in cell-cycle kinetics that were characterized by prolonged S phase and reduced cyclin A expression. Differentiation of primitive CD34 + cells cultured for 14 to 18 days in RWV favored myeloid cell development at the expense of erythroid development, which was significantly reduced compared to controls.These results illustrate that mμ-g significantly inhibits the migration potential, cell-cycle progression, and differentiation patterns of primitive BM CD34 + cells, which may contribute to some of the hematologic abnormalities observed in humans during space flight.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)773-781
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Hematology
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

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Weightlessness
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Bone Marrow Cells
Space Flight
Cell Cycle
Homeostasis
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Astronauts
Chemokine CXCL12
Cyclin A
Cell Cycle Proteins
Stem Cell Factor
Gravitation
Myeloid Cells
S Phase
Immunosuppression
Cell Movement
Actins
Anemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Impact of modeled microgravity on migration, differentiation, and cell cycle control of primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells. / Plett, P. Artur; Abonour, Rafat; Frankovitz, Stacy M.; Orschell, Christie.

In: Experimental Hematology, Vol. 32, No. 8, 08.2004, p. 773-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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