Impact of socioeconomic markers on parents' retention of pediatric oncology home care education: A pilot study

Cristiana Hentea, Stephen Downs, Brownsne Tucker Edmonds, Terry Vik, Sarah Wiehe, Erika R. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Little is known about the extent to which parents retain the education on how to manage home medical emergencies. We sought to describe retention of pediatric oncology home care education (POHCE) in a cohort of 24 parents of newly diagnosed children with cancer and investigate sociodemographic disparities in this retention. We measured retention using a vignette-based survey instrument. The mean score was 4 (range 0–6, SD = 1.6) and parents with high school only education and those with limited cancer health literacy scored lowest (2.5 and 2.8, respectively). Future POHCE interventions can focus on parents’ literacy and education levels as predictors to tailor alternative education strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere27624
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Home Care Services
Parents
Pediatrics
Education
Health Literacy
Patient-Centered Care
Neoplasms
Emergencies

Keywords

  • cancer diagnosis education
  • parental education
  • pediatric cancer
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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abstract = "Little is known about the extent to which parents retain the education on how to manage home medical emergencies. We sought to describe retention of pediatric oncology home care education (POHCE) in a cohort of 24 parents of newly diagnosed children with cancer and investigate sociodemographic disparities in this retention. We measured retention using a vignette-based survey instrument. The mean score was 4 (range 0–6, SD = 1.6) and parents with high school only education and those with limited cancer health literacy scored lowest (2.5 and 2.8, respectively). Future POHCE interventions can focus on parents’ literacy and education levels as predictors to tailor alternative education strategies.",
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AU - Downs, Stephen

AU - Tucker Edmonds, Brownsne

AU - Vik, Terry

AU - Wiehe, Sarah

AU - Cheng, Erika R.

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AB - Little is known about the extent to which parents retain the education on how to manage home medical emergencies. We sought to describe retention of pediatric oncology home care education (POHCE) in a cohort of 24 parents of newly diagnosed children with cancer and investigate sociodemographic disparities in this retention. We measured retention using a vignette-based survey instrument. The mean score was 4 (range 0–6, SD = 1.6) and parents with high school only education and those with limited cancer health literacy scored lowest (2.5 and 2.8, respectively). Future POHCE interventions can focus on parents’ literacy and education levels as predictors to tailor alternative education strategies.

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