Impaired alveolar macrophage accessory cell function and reduced incidence of lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-infected patients who smoke

Homer L. Twigg, Diaa M. Soliman, Blake A. Spain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effects of smoking on alveolar macrophage (AM) accessory cell (AC) function and the incidence of lymphocytic alveolitis in asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals. Methods: AM AC function in smoking and nonsmoking HIV-positive volunteers was measured in concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen assays. Mitogen-induced AM-T-cell adherence was determined. AM cytokine secretion was analyzed by interleukin (IL)-6 bioassay and IL-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The incidence of lymphocytic alveolitis in both groups was determined. Results: AM from smokers were significantly poorer AC than AM from nonsmokers. Though AM-T-cell adherence was unaffected by smoking, IL-1 and IL-6 secretion was significantly impaired. Lymphocytic alveolitis was significantly less common in HIV-infected smokers. Conclusion: Smoking reduces AM AC function in HIV-infected individuals, probably by impairing secretion of cytokines important in T-cell proliferation. This may explain the decreased incidence of lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-infected people who smoke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)611-618
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1994

Keywords

  • Accessory cell
  • Alveolar macrophage
  • Alveolar macrophage-T-cell adherence
  • HIV infection
  • Interleukin-1
  • Interleukin-6
  • Lymphocytic alveolitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

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