Implementation of a stroke self-management program

A randomized controlled pilot study of veterans with stroke: A randomized controlled pilot study of veterans with stroke

Teresa Damush, Susan Ofner, Zhangsheng Yu, Laurie Plue, Gloria Nicholas, Linda Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secondary stroke prevention is championed as guideline care; yet there are no systematic programs offered. We developed a stroke self-management program to address this gap and pilot test the program. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at two Veterans Administration (VA) hospital sites where we recruited patients with an acute stroke to receive either the stroke program or an attention-control protocol over a 12-week period following hospital discharge. The stroke program included six sessions that facilitated stroke self management focusing on increasing self-efficacy to recover from stroke and engage in secondary stroke risk factor management. We surveyed outcomes at baseline, 3 and 6 months. We conducted an intention to treat analysis comparing the intervention to the control group on changes of outcomes between baseline and follow-up modeled by a linear model with fixed effects for treatment, visit, and the treatment by visit interaction adjusting for baseline. We recruited 63 participants (33 control and 30 intervention) who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke. We found trends in differences between groups on self-efficacy to communicate with physicians, weekly minutes spent in aerobic exercise, and on dimensions of stroke-specific quality of life. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of delivering a stroke self-management program to recent stroke survivors in a healthcare organization. The program also demonstrated improvements in patient self-efficacy, self-management behaviors, specific dimensions of stroke-specific quality of life compared to a group that received an attention placebo program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)561-572
Number of pages12
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Veterans
Self Care
Stroke
Self Efficacy
Quality of Life
Veterans Hospitals
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Intention to Treat Analysis
Risk Management
Secondary Prevention
Survivors
Linear Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Organizations
Guidelines
Exercise

Keywords

  • Behavioral interventions
  • Self-efficacy
  • Stroke health-related quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Secondary stroke prevention is championed as guideline care; yet there are no systematic programs offered. We developed a stroke self-management program to address this gap and pilot test the program. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at two Veterans Administration (VA) hospital sites where we recruited patients with an acute stroke to receive either the stroke program or an attention-control protocol over a 12-week period following hospital discharge. The stroke program included six sessions that facilitated stroke self management focusing on increasing self-efficacy to recover from stroke and engage in secondary stroke risk factor management. We surveyed outcomes at baseline, 3 and 6 months. We conducted an intention to treat analysis comparing the intervention to the control group on changes of outcomes between baseline and follow-up modeled by a linear model with fixed effects for treatment, visit, and the treatment by visit interaction adjusting for baseline. We recruited 63 participants (33 control and 30 intervention) who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke. We found trends in differences between groups on self-efficacy to communicate with physicians, weekly minutes spent in aerobic exercise, and on dimensions of stroke-specific quality of life. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of delivering a stroke self-management program to recent stroke survivors in a healthcare organization. The program also demonstrated improvements in patient self-efficacy, self-management behaviors, specific dimensions of stroke-specific quality of life compared to a group that received an attention placebo program.",
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AU - Nicholas, Gloria

AU - Williams, Linda

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