Implementing measurement-based care (iMBC) for depression in community mental health: A dynamic cluster randomized trial study protocol

Cara C. Lewis, Kelli Scott, C. Nathan Marti, Brigid R. Marriott, Kurt Kroenke, John W. Putz, Peter Mendel, David Rutkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Measurement-based care is an evidence-based practice for depression that efficiently identifies treatment non-responders and those who might otherwise deteriorate [1]. However, measurement-based care is underutilized in community mental health with data suggesting fewer than 20% of behavioral health providers using this practice to inform treatment. It remains unclear whether standardized or tailored approaches to implementation are needed to optimize measurement-based care fidelity and penetration. Moreover, there is some suggestion that prospectively tailored interventions that are designed to fit the dynamic context may optimize public health impact, though no randomized trials have yet tested this notion [2]. This study will address the following three aims: (1) To compare the effect of standardized versus tailored MBC implementation on clinician-level and client-level outcomes; (2) To identify contextual mediators of MBC fidelity; and (3) To explore the impact of MBC fidelity on client outcomes. Methods/design: This study is a dynamic cluster randomized trial of standardized versus tailored measurement-based care implementation in Centerstone, the largest provider of community-based mental health services in the USA. This prospective, mixed methods implementation-effectiveness hybrid design allows for evaluation of the two conditions on both clinician-level (e.g., MBC fidelity) and client-level (depression symptom change) outcomes. Central to this investigation is the focus on identifying contextual factors (e.g., attitudes, resources, process, etc.) that mediate MBC fidelity and optimize client outcomes. Discussion: This study will contribute generalizable and practical strategies for implementing systematic symptom monitoring to inform and enhance behavioral healthcare. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02266134 .

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number127
JournalImplementation Science
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2015

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Clinical Protocols
Mental Health
Depression
Community Mental Health Services
Evidence-Based Practice
Public Health
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Implementing measurement-based care (iMBC) for depression in community mental health : A dynamic cluster randomized trial study protocol. / Lewis, Cara C.; Scott, Kelli; Marti, C. Nathan; Marriott, Brigid R.; Kroenke, Kurt; Putz, John W.; Mendel, Peter; Rutkowski, David.

In: Implementation Science, Vol. 10, No. 1, 127, 07.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, Cara C. ; Scott, Kelli ; Marti, C. Nathan ; Marriott, Brigid R. ; Kroenke, Kurt ; Putz, John W. ; Mendel, Peter ; Rutkowski, David. / Implementing measurement-based care (iMBC) for depression in community mental health : A dynamic cluster randomized trial study protocol. In: Implementation Science. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
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