Improved detection of gadolinium enhancement using magnetization transfer imaging

A. D. Elster, Vincent Mathews, J. C. King, C. A. Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging is a new MR imaging technique in which off-resonance radiofrequency pulses are used to selectively saturate protons in macromolecules. This saturation effect is transferred subsequently (by dipolar and chemical exchange interactions) to protons in free water, thereby altering tissue relaxation times and modulating image contrast. Gadolinium enhancement is not significantly mediated by macromolecular interactions and is, therefore, not suppressed by MT pulses. The theory underlying the use of the MT technique is presented, with examples of its clinical usefulness in improving contrast enhancement for a variety of central nervous system diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroimaging Clinics of North America
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Gadolinium
Protons
Central Nervous System Diseases
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Improved detection of gadolinium enhancement using magnetization transfer imaging. / Elster, A. D.; Mathews, Vincent; King, J. C.; Hamilton, C. A.

In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1994, p. 185-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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