Improvements in speech perception by children with profound prelingual hearing loss: Effects of device, communication mode, and chronological age

Ted A. Meyer, Mario A. Svirsky, Karen I. Kirk, Richard T. Miyamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present investigation expanded on an earlier study by Miyamoto, Osberger, Todd, Robbins, Karasek, et al. (1994) who compared the speech perception skills of two groups of children with profound prelingual hearing loss. The first group had received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant and was tested longitudinally. The second group, who were not implanted and used conventional hearing aids, was tested at a single point in time. In the present study, speech perception scores were examined over time for both groups of children as a function of communication mode of the child. Separate linear regressions of speech perception scores as a function of age were computed to estimate the rate of improvement in speech perception abilities that might be expected due to maturation for the hearing aid users (n = 58) within each communication mode. The resulting regression lines were used to compare the estimated rate of speech perception growth for each hearing aid group to the observed gains in speech perception made by the children with multichannel cochlear implants. A large number of children using cochlear implants (n = 74) were tested over a long period of implant use (m = 3.5 years) that ranged from zero to 8.5 years. In general, speech perception scores for the children using cochlear implants were higher than those predicted for a group of children with 101-110 dB HL of hearing loss using hearing aids, and they approached the scores predicted for a group of children with 90-100 dB HL of hearing loss using hearing aids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)846-858
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998

Keywords

  • Cochlear implants
  • Hearing aids
  • Profound prelingual hearing loss
  • Speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Linguistics and Language

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