Improving breast health education for Hispanic women.

Christine M. Darling, Carolina Pimentel Nelson, Rose Fife

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hispanic women are less likely to receive screening mammograms than are white or African American women, even though breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the population. Between 1990 and 2000, the Hispanic population of Indianapolis, Indiana (Marion County) grew by approximately 300%: from 8450 to 33 290. The present project was undertaken to provide educational outreach in Spanish to the new Hispanic residents of Indianapolis. A bilingual outreach coordinator visited community centers, churches, and health clinics and presented information to Hispanic women and men about a variety of cancers for which Hispanic women are at particularly high risk, including breast and cervical cancer. The number of Hispanic women obtaining mammograms rose by more than 200% during the first 6 months of the program. The authors conclude that culturally appropriate educational outreach presented by a Spanish-speaking woman using a Spanish-language videotape about mammography can improve breast cancer screening in Latinas.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Medical Women"s Association (1972)
Volume59
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2004

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Health Education
Hispanic Americans
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Community Health Centers
Videotape Recording
Mammography
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
African Americans
Population
Neoplasms
Language

Cite this

Improving breast health education for Hispanic women. / Darling, Christine M.; Nelson, Carolina Pimentel; Fife, Rose.

In: Journal of the American Medical Women"s Association (1972), Vol. 59, No. 3, 2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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