Improving compliance with exercise in adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

Results of a self-motivated home exercise program

David Marrero, A. S. Fremion, M. P. Golden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this project we investigated the impact of a 12-week at-home aerobic fitness program on aerobic capacity and metabolic control of ten adolescents (four girls and six boys 12 to 14 years of age) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The adolescents had no prior experience with exercise training. The 45-minute program, designed by a physical therapist, consisted of a stretching, calisthenics, and 'cool-down' routine set to popular music. It was taught to the youngsters in group sessions. Each adolescent was given audio- and videocassettes of the routine for home use that emphasized self-motivation in maintaining training. The youngsters were asked to exercise three times per week and were also taught how to adjust their insulin and diet for exercise. Aerobic fitness was determined by maximal oxygen uptake following a vigorous, continuous progressive cycling test; metabolic control was measured by glycosylated hemoglobin values. All of the adolescents reported > 85% completion of the program. The youngsters displayed a correspondingly significant increase in aerobic fitness as measured by maximal oxygen uptake: 40.39 ± 8.87 v 44.86 ± 12.89 mL/kg/min. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels (mean ± SD) for the entire group were significantly reduced after the program (11.41 ± 4.47% v 10.01 ± 3.21%). Results of this study indicate that nonathletic adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus can engage in self-motivated exercise training at home. If properly designed, such programs can improve aerobic fitness and may contribute to improvement in diabetes control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-525
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume81
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Exercise
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Oxygen
Gymnastics
Physical Therapists
Music
Insulin
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Improving compliance with exercise in adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus : Results of a self-motivated home exercise program. / Marrero, David; Fremion, A. S.; Golden, M. P.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 81, No. 4, 1988, p. 519-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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