Improving functional status in arthritis: The effect of social support

Morris Weinberger, Sharon L. Hiner, William M. Tierney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present data from a longitudinal study of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and/or hip. One component of this study involved interviewers telephoning patients bi-weekly for 6 months to inquire about stressors which they have experienced and to obtain self-assessment of their health. We hypothesized that telephone interviewers (TI) may provide OA patients with social support, and thus improve their functional status. Patients' functional status (physical disability, psychological disability, and pain) improved significantly after 6 months of receiving bi-weekly telephone calls. Since our outcome variables have been shown to be reliable measures of disability over time, and because OA is a progressively degenerative process, one would expect deterioration rather than improvement. Furthermore, since patients reported more social support at 6 months than at baseline, we attributed the improvement in health status to the TIs being viewed as a source of social support to elderly persons who may have support deficits. We suggest that future studies redefine TIs' roles from an unbiased data collector to a provider of social support. TIs should follow their own panel of patients so that continuity can be established. Furthermore, TIs should undergo training about OA, its treatment, common medications and their side effects, and other pertinent information. In this manner, social support may be further enhanced and provide the greatest potential to improve patients' health status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)899-904
Number of pages6
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Social Support
Arthritis
social support
disability
health status
Osteoarthritis
telephone
self assessment
Telephone
Health Status
physical disability
self-assessment
interview
Interviews
Hip Osteoarthritis
pain
longitudinal study
Knee Osteoarthritis
deficit
continuity

Keywords

  • functional status
  • health status
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Improving functional status in arthritis : The effect of social support. / Weinberger, Morris; Hiner, Sharon L.; Tierney, William M.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 9, 1986, p. 899-904.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weinberger, Morris ; Hiner, Sharon L. ; Tierney, William M. / Improving functional status in arthritis : The effect of social support. In: Social Science and Medicine. 1986 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 899-904.
@article{c38ba4b28aff43f38752304d587dcbbb,
title = "Improving functional status in arthritis: The effect of social support",
abstract = "We present data from a longitudinal study of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and/or hip. One component of this study involved interviewers telephoning patients bi-weekly for 6 months to inquire about stressors which they have experienced and to obtain self-assessment of their health. We hypothesized that telephone interviewers (TI) may provide OA patients with social support, and thus improve their functional status. Patients' functional status (physical disability, psychological disability, and pain) improved significantly after 6 months of receiving bi-weekly telephone calls. Since our outcome variables have been shown to be reliable measures of disability over time, and because OA is a progressively degenerative process, one would expect deterioration rather than improvement. Furthermore, since patients reported more social support at 6 months than at baseline, we attributed the improvement in health status to the TIs being viewed as a source of social support to elderly persons who may have support deficits. We suggest that future studies redefine TIs' roles from an unbiased data collector to a provider of social support. TIs should follow their own panel of patients so that continuity can be established. Furthermore, TIs should undergo training about OA, its treatment, common medications and their side effects, and other pertinent information. In this manner, social support may be further enhanced and provide the greatest potential to improve patients' health status.",
keywords = "functional status, health status, social support",
author = "Morris Weinberger and Hiner, {Sharon L.} and Tierney, {William M.}",
year = "1986",
doi = "10.1016/0277-9536(86)90218-2",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "899--904",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving functional status in arthritis

T2 - The effect of social support

AU - Weinberger, Morris

AU - Hiner, Sharon L.

AU - Tierney, William M.

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - We present data from a longitudinal study of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and/or hip. One component of this study involved interviewers telephoning patients bi-weekly for 6 months to inquire about stressors which they have experienced and to obtain self-assessment of their health. We hypothesized that telephone interviewers (TI) may provide OA patients with social support, and thus improve their functional status. Patients' functional status (physical disability, psychological disability, and pain) improved significantly after 6 months of receiving bi-weekly telephone calls. Since our outcome variables have been shown to be reliable measures of disability over time, and because OA is a progressively degenerative process, one would expect deterioration rather than improvement. Furthermore, since patients reported more social support at 6 months than at baseline, we attributed the improvement in health status to the TIs being viewed as a source of social support to elderly persons who may have support deficits. We suggest that future studies redefine TIs' roles from an unbiased data collector to a provider of social support. TIs should follow their own panel of patients so that continuity can be established. Furthermore, TIs should undergo training about OA, its treatment, common medications and their side effects, and other pertinent information. In this manner, social support may be further enhanced and provide the greatest potential to improve patients' health status.

AB - We present data from a longitudinal study of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and/or hip. One component of this study involved interviewers telephoning patients bi-weekly for 6 months to inquire about stressors which they have experienced and to obtain self-assessment of their health. We hypothesized that telephone interviewers (TI) may provide OA patients with social support, and thus improve their functional status. Patients' functional status (physical disability, psychological disability, and pain) improved significantly after 6 months of receiving bi-weekly telephone calls. Since our outcome variables have been shown to be reliable measures of disability over time, and because OA is a progressively degenerative process, one would expect deterioration rather than improvement. Furthermore, since patients reported more social support at 6 months than at baseline, we attributed the improvement in health status to the TIs being viewed as a source of social support to elderly persons who may have support deficits. We suggest that future studies redefine TIs' roles from an unbiased data collector to a provider of social support. TIs should follow their own panel of patients so that continuity can be established. Furthermore, TIs should undergo training about OA, its treatment, common medications and their side effects, and other pertinent information. In this manner, social support may be further enhanced and provide the greatest potential to improve patients' health status.

KW - functional status

KW - health status

KW - social support

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022989085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022989085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0277-9536(86)90218-2

DO - 10.1016/0277-9536(86)90218-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 3798168

AN - SCOPUS:0022989085

VL - 23

SP - 899

EP - 904

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 9

ER -