Improving police officer and justice personnel attitudes and de-escalation skills: A pilot study of Policing the Teen Brain

Matthew C. Aalsma, Katherine Schwartz, Wanzhu Tu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This pilot study assessed whether police officers and juvenile justice personnel reported improved attitudes toward youth and knowledge about de-escalation skills after attending Policing the Teen Brain, a training created to prevent arrests by improving officer-youth interactions. Pre- and post-intervention surveys asked about participant attitudes toward adolescents, adolescence as a stressful stage, and punishing youth in the justice system. Among the 232 participants, paired sample t-tests indicated significant differences between mean pre- and post-survey responses on nearly all survey subscales. A hierarchical regression model significantly predicted improvement in knowledge, with educated, female participants most likely to improve knowledge of de-escalation skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-430
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Offender Rehabilitation
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

Keywords

  • Juvenile offenders
  • evidence based practice
  • principles of effective intervention
  • quantitative research
  • violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Law

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