Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback

A randomized controlled trial

Catarina I. Kiefe, Jeroan J. Allison, O. Dale Williams, Sharina D. Person, Michael T. Weaver, Norman W. Weissman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

336 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Performance feedback and benchmarking, common tools for health care improvement, are rarely studied in randomized trials. Achievable Benchmarks of Care (ABCs) are standards of excellence attained by top performers in a peer group and are easily and reproducibly calculated from existing performance data. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of using achievable benchmarks to enhance typical physician performance feedback and improve care. Design: Group-randomized controlled trial conducted in December 1996, with follow-up through 1998. Setting and Participants: Seventy community physicians and 2978 fee-for-service Medicare patients with diabetes mellitus who were part of the Ambulatory Care Quality Improvement Project in Alabama. Intervention: Physicians were randomly assigned to receive a multimodal improvement intervention, including chart review and physician-specific feedback (comparison group; n=35) or an identical intervention plus achievable benchmark feedback (experimental group; n=35). Main Outcome Measure: Preintervention (1994-1995) to postintervention (1997-1998) changes in the proportion of patients receiving influenza vaccination; foot examination; and each of 3 blood tests measuring glucose control, cholesterol level, and triglyceride level, compared between the 2 groups. Results: The proportion of patients who received influenza vaccine improved from 40% to 58% in the experimental group (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2871-2879
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume285
Issue number22
StatePublished - Jun 13 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Benchmarking
Quality Improvement
Randomized Controlled Trials
Physicians
Standard of Care
Peer Group
Fee-for-Service Plans
Influenza Vaccines
Hematologic Tests
Ambulatory Care
Medicare
Human Influenza
Foot
Diabetes Mellitus
Vaccination
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kiefe, C. I., Allison, J. J., Williams, O. D., Person, S. D., Weaver, M. T., & Weissman, N. W. (2001). Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association, 285(22), 2871-2879.

Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback : A randomized controlled trial. / Kiefe, Catarina I.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Williams, O. Dale; Person, Sharina D.; Weaver, Michael T.; Weissman, Norman W.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 285, No. 22, 13.06.2001, p. 2871-2879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiefe, CI, Allison, JJ, Williams, OD, Person, SD, Weaver, MT & Weissman, NW 2001, 'Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 285, no. 22, pp. 2871-2879.
Kiefe CI, Allison JJ, Williams OD, Person SD, Weaver MT, Weissman NW. Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2001 Jun 13;285(22):2871-2879.
Kiefe, Catarina I. ; Allison, Jeroan J. ; Williams, O. Dale ; Person, Sharina D. ; Weaver, Michael T. ; Weissman, Norman W. / Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2001 ; Vol. 285, No. 22. pp. 2871-2879.
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