Improving recruitment and retention of adolescents and young adults with cancer in randomized controlled clinical trials

Sharron L. Docherty, Stacey Crane, Joan Haase, Sheri Robb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Participation of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is necessary to advance treatments and psychosocial programs. Exploring AYAs experiences in an RCT will inform strategies to support recruitment and retention. A qualitative design was used to study the experiences of 13 AYAs in the Stories and Music for Adolescent and Young Adult Resilience during Transplant I (SMART I) trial. Key themes included: Weighing the Pros and Cons; Randomization Preferences; Completing Measures; and Worthwhile Experience. The experiences of AYAs during RCTs can bring insights that inform the design and management of AYA trials. Strategies include improving assent/consent processes, design of electronic interfaces and encouraging researcher flexibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Randomized Controlled Trials
Neoplasms
Music
Random Allocation
Research Personnel
Transplants
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • cancer
  • clinical trials
  • research experiences
  • research participation
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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