In utero bone marrow transplantation of fetal baboons with mismatched adult baboon marrow

G. David Roodman, T. J. Kuehl, J. L. Vandeberg, D. Y. Muirhead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In utero bone marrow transplantation to fetuses offers the potential advantage of ameliorating the effects of genetic disorders by transplanting allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells into recipients who are immunoincompetent and require no preparative regimen. Therefore, we undertook studies to examine the feasibility of in utero bone marrow transplantation of unrelated allogeneic adult bone marrow into fetal baboons. Thirty-one baboon fetuses were transplanted between the ages of 60 and 160 days gestation (normal gestation, 182 days) with unrelated allogeneic adult bone marrow containing a different isozyme of glucose-phosphate isomerase (GPI). Approximately one third of the 80-day fetuses demonstrated engraftment 1 month after transplantation. Three of three of the initial chimeras died in utero 45 to 80 days after transplantation and the remaining chimeras lost their graft. Furthermore, 80-day fetal baboons were able to recognize donor cells, maternal cells, and other adult baboon peripheral blood cells in a mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) reaction but still survived to term. These data suggest that fetal transplantation of primates is feasible using techniques employed in these studies and that transplantation of younger fetuses who are immunocompetent should be attempted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-375
Number of pages9
JournalBlood Cells
Volume17
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papio
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Fetus
Bone Marrow
Transplantation
xylose isomerase
Transplantation Chimera
Pregnancy
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Mixed Lymphocyte Culture Test
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Primates
Isoenzymes
Blood Cells
Phosphates
Mothers
Transplants

Keywords

  • Baboons
  • Bone marrow transplantation
  • Fetal
  • In utero

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Roodman, G. D., Kuehl, T. J., Vandeberg, J. L., & Muirhead, D. Y. (1991). In utero bone marrow transplantation of fetal baboons with mismatched adult baboon marrow. Blood Cells, 17(2), 367-375.

In utero bone marrow transplantation of fetal baboons with mismatched adult baboon marrow. / Roodman, G. David; Kuehl, T. J.; Vandeberg, J. L.; Muirhead, D. Y.

In: Blood Cells, Vol. 17, No. 2, 1991, p. 367-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roodman, GD, Kuehl, TJ, Vandeberg, JL & Muirhead, DY 1991, 'In utero bone marrow transplantation of fetal baboons with mismatched adult baboon marrow', Blood Cells, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 367-375.
Roodman, G. David ; Kuehl, T. J. ; Vandeberg, J. L. ; Muirhead, D. Y. / In utero bone marrow transplantation of fetal baboons with mismatched adult baboon marrow. In: Blood Cells. 1991 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 367-375.
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