In vivo protection of hematopoietic cells from alkylator-mediated DNA damage.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Strategies that confer chemoresistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells have two important future applications in the treatment of cancer and genetic diseases. Because dose-intensification of many cancer chemotherapy protocols is limited by severe hematopoietic toxicities, generation of primitive hematopoietic cells resistant to DNA damage mediated by chemotherapy may protect patients from life-threatening blood cytopenias. In addition, in the context of genetic diseases, overexpression of a chemoresistance gene in stem and progenitor cells may allow for the enrichment of small numbers of transduced cells that would not possess an in vivo selective advantage. In this report, I discuss studies that use the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase to protect hematopoietic cells from alkylator therapy. I focus on investigations evaluating the ability of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase mutant proteins to confer heightened resistance to alkylator-mediated DNA damage in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-347
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent hematology reports
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2003

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Inborn Genetic Diseases
Cytoprotection
Alkylating Agents
Methyltransferases
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
DNA Damage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
Stem Cells
DNA
Mutant Proteins
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
DNA Repair
Cell Count
Drug Therapy
Genes
Neoplasms
Proteins
O-(6)-methylguanine
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

In vivo protection of hematopoietic cells from alkylator-mediated DNA damage. / Pollok, Karen.

In: Current hematology reports, Vol. 2, No. 4, 07.2003, p. 341-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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