Incidence and prevalence of herpes simplex virus infections in adolescent women

Kenneth Fife, J. Fortenberry, Susan Ofner, Barry Katz, Rhoda Ashley Morrow, Donald P. Orr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We conducted this study to examine the incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV 2 infection in a cohort of young women who were closely followed for acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. STUDY DESIGN: Women between the ages of 14 and 18 years had blood and genital specimens obtained quarterly to test for incident sexually transmitted infections. Subjects also had 2 12-week periods each year when they kept a detailed behavioral diary and performed weekly vaginal swabs. Serum specimens were tested for HSV 1 and HSV 2 antibody, and genital specimens were tested for HSV DNA by PCR. RESULTS: A total of 100 subjects enrolled and had at least 2 sera that could be analyzed for seroconversion. The mean age of the subjects was 15.8 years at entry. The HSV 1 and HSV 2 seroprevalence at entry was 59.6% and 13.5%, respectively. During the study, 4 subjects acquired HSV 1 antibody and 7 acquired HSV 2 antibody, but there were no cases of symptomatic HSV infection identified. The annualized incidence among susceptible individuals was 8.9% for HSV 1 and 7.4% for HSV 2. Three of the 7 HSV 2 seroconverters had HSV 2 DNA detected in vaginal swabs. Age, duration of sexual activity, and the presence of other sexually transmitted infections were predictors of HSV 2 antibody positivity. CONCLUSIONS: Acquisition of HSV 1 and HSV 2 is relatively common in adolescent women, although symptomatic infection is uncommon. HSV 2 is shed in the genital tract despite the lack of symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-444
Number of pages4
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume33
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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Human Herpesvirus 2
Virus Diseases
Simplexvirus
Human Herpesvirus 1
Incidence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Antibodies
DNA
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Serum
Sexual Behavior
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Incidence and prevalence of herpes simplex virus infections in adolescent women. / Fife, Kenneth; Fortenberry, J.; Ofner, Susan; Katz, Barry; Morrow, Rhoda Ashley; Orr, Donald P.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 33, No. 7, 06.2006, p. 441-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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