Increased lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct during manipulative intervention

E. Marty Knott, Johnathan Tune, Scott T. Stoll, H. Fred Downey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The thoracic pump and the abdominal pump are osteopathic manipulative (OM) lymphatic pump techniques frequently used by osteopathic physicians to treat patients with infections (eg, pneumonia, otitis media). Although there is a widely accepted belief among the osteopathic medical profession that increasing lymphatic flow is beneficial, no measurements of lymph flow during osteopathic manipulative treatment have been reported. The authors surgically instrumented five mongrel dogs to record lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct (TDF) and cardiac variables during three intervention protocols. After recovery from surgery, canine subjects were placed in a standing-support sling, and TDF, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded during two randomized 30-second sessions of manipulative intervention using the osteopathic thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques on two successive days. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct increased from 1.57±0.20 mL•min -1 to a peak TDF of 4.80±1.73 mL•min -1 during abdominal pump, and from 1.20±0.41mL•min -1 to 3.45±1.61 mL•min -1 during thoracic pump. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct and cardiac variables were also recorded for canine subjects during physical activity (ie, treadmill exercise at 3 miles per hour at 0% incline). During physical activity, TDF increased from 1.47±0.33 mL•min -1 to 5.81±1.30 mL•min -1. Although cardiac variables did not change significantly during manipulative intervention with lymphatic pump techniques, cardiac output and heart rate did increase during physical activity. The authors conclude that physical activity and manipulative intervention using thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques produced net increases in TDF (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-456
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Osteopathic Association
Volume105
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thoracic Duct
Exercise
Lymph
Thorax
Cardiac Output
Canidae
Arterial Pressure
Osteopathic Manipulation
Heart Rate
Osteopathic Physicians
Otitis Media
Pneumonia
Dogs
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Increased lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct during manipulative intervention. / Knott, E. Marty; Tune, Johnathan; Stoll, Scott T.; Downey, H. Fred.

In: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Vol. 105, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 447-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knott, E. Marty ; Tune, Johnathan ; Stoll, Scott T. ; Downey, H. Fred. / Increased lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct during manipulative intervention. In: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 2005 ; Vol. 105, No. 10. pp. 447-456.
@article{92e155c6d5c043c39cbbd4b7edfde7d4,
title = "Increased lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct during manipulative intervention",
abstract = "The thoracic pump and the abdominal pump are osteopathic manipulative (OM) lymphatic pump techniques frequently used by osteopathic physicians to treat patients with infections (eg, pneumonia, otitis media). Although there is a widely accepted belief among the osteopathic medical profession that increasing lymphatic flow is beneficial, no measurements of lymph flow during osteopathic manipulative treatment have been reported. The authors surgically instrumented five mongrel dogs to record lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct (TDF) and cardiac variables during three intervention protocols. After recovery from surgery, canine subjects were placed in a standing-support sling, and TDF, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded during two randomized 30-second sessions of manipulative intervention using the osteopathic thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques on two successive days. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct increased from 1.57±0.20 mL•min -1 to a peak TDF of 4.80±1.73 mL•min -1 during abdominal pump, and from 1.20±0.41mL•min -1 to 3.45±1.61 mL•min -1 during thoracic pump. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct and cardiac variables were also recorded for canine subjects during physical activity (ie, treadmill exercise at 3 miles per hour at 0{\%} incline). During physical activity, TDF increased from 1.47±0.33 mL•min -1 to 5.81±1.30 mL•min -1. Although cardiac variables did not change significantly during manipulative intervention with lymphatic pump techniques, cardiac output and heart rate did increase during physical activity. The authors conclude that physical activity and manipulative intervention using thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques produced net increases in TDF (P",
author = "Knott, {E. Marty} and Johnathan Tune and Stoll, {Scott T.} and Downey, {H. Fred}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "105",
pages = "447--456",
journal = "The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association",
issn = "0098-6151",
publisher = "American Osteopathic Association",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct during manipulative intervention

AU - Knott, E. Marty

AU - Tune, Johnathan

AU - Stoll, Scott T.

AU - Downey, H. Fred

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - The thoracic pump and the abdominal pump are osteopathic manipulative (OM) lymphatic pump techniques frequently used by osteopathic physicians to treat patients with infections (eg, pneumonia, otitis media). Although there is a widely accepted belief among the osteopathic medical profession that increasing lymphatic flow is beneficial, no measurements of lymph flow during osteopathic manipulative treatment have been reported. The authors surgically instrumented five mongrel dogs to record lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct (TDF) and cardiac variables during three intervention protocols. After recovery from surgery, canine subjects were placed in a standing-support sling, and TDF, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded during two randomized 30-second sessions of manipulative intervention using the osteopathic thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques on two successive days. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct increased from 1.57±0.20 mL•min -1 to a peak TDF of 4.80±1.73 mL•min -1 during abdominal pump, and from 1.20±0.41mL•min -1 to 3.45±1.61 mL•min -1 during thoracic pump. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct and cardiac variables were also recorded for canine subjects during physical activity (ie, treadmill exercise at 3 miles per hour at 0% incline). During physical activity, TDF increased from 1.47±0.33 mL•min -1 to 5.81±1.30 mL•min -1. Although cardiac variables did not change significantly during manipulative intervention with lymphatic pump techniques, cardiac output and heart rate did increase during physical activity. The authors conclude that physical activity and manipulative intervention using thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques produced net increases in TDF (P

AB - The thoracic pump and the abdominal pump are osteopathic manipulative (OM) lymphatic pump techniques frequently used by osteopathic physicians to treat patients with infections (eg, pneumonia, otitis media). Although there is a widely accepted belief among the osteopathic medical profession that increasing lymphatic flow is beneficial, no measurements of lymph flow during osteopathic manipulative treatment have been reported. The authors surgically instrumented five mongrel dogs to record lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct (TDF) and cardiac variables during three intervention protocols. After recovery from surgery, canine subjects were placed in a standing-support sling, and TDF, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded during two randomized 30-second sessions of manipulative intervention using the osteopathic thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques on two successive days. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct increased from 1.57±0.20 mL•min -1 to a peak TDF of 4.80±1.73 mL•min -1 during abdominal pump, and from 1.20±0.41mL•min -1 to 3.45±1.61 mL•min -1 during thoracic pump. Lymph flow in the thoracic duct and cardiac variables were also recorded for canine subjects during physical activity (ie, treadmill exercise at 3 miles per hour at 0% incline). During physical activity, TDF increased from 1.47±0.33 mL•min -1 to 5.81±1.30 mL•min -1. Although cardiac variables did not change significantly during manipulative intervention with lymphatic pump techniques, cardiac output and heart rate did increase during physical activity. The authors conclude that physical activity and manipulative intervention using thoracic pump and abdominal pump techniques produced net increases in TDF (P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28744458690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28744458690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 105

SP - 447

EP - 456

JO - The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

JF - The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

SN - 0098-6151

IS - 10

ER -