Increasing incidence of cancer of the prostate. The experience of black and white men in the Detroit metropolitan area

Raymond Y. Demers, G. Marie Swanson, Linda K. Weiss, Tsing Ying Kau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prostate cancer mortality and incidence rates have been gradually increasing for decades in the United States, with an accelerated increase in incidence noted in the past several years. This study explores in detail the occurrence of prostate cancer in southeast Michigan from 1973 through 1991. Methods: Data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program are analyzed with emphasis on time trends by race, age, stage, and treatment. Results: Population-based rates for prostate cancer increased by 70% between 1988 and 1991. Increases are most pronounced for early stage disease and among whites compared with blacks. Corresponding increases in treatment with radical prostatectomy are also observed. Conclusion: Increased incidence of prostate cancer is likely a result of widespread use of prostate-specific antigen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1216
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume154
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jun 13 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Incidence
SEER Program
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostatectomy
Mortality
hydroquinone
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Increasing incidence of cancer of the prostate. The experience of black and white men in the Detroit metropolitan area. / Demers, Raymond Y.; Swanson, G. Marie; Weiss, Linda K.; Kau, Tsing Ying.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 154, No. 11, 13.06.1994, p. 1211-1216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Demers, Raymond Y. ; Swanson, G. Marie ; Weiss, Linda K. ; Kau, Tsing Ying. / Increasing incidence of cancer of the prostate. The experience of black and white men in the Detroit metropolitan area. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 154, No. 11. pp. 1211-1216.
@article{10f19a8c230f42e4a7ddfa9d6cb22e6e,
title = "Increasing incidence of cancer of the prostate. The experience of black and white men in the Detroit metropolitan area",
abstract = "Background: Prostate cancer mortality and incidence rates have been gradually increasing for decades in the United States, with an accelerated increase in incidence noted in the past several years. This study explores in detail the occurrence of prostate cancer in southeast Michigan from 1973 through 1991. Methods: Data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program are analyzed with emphasis on time trends by race, age, stage, and treatment. Results: Population-based rates for prostate cancer increased by 70{\%} between 1988 and 1991. Increases are most pronounced for early stage disease and among whites compared with blacks. Corresponding increases in treatment with radical prostatectomy are also observed. Conclusion: Increased incidence of prostate cancer is likely a result of widespread use of prostate-specific antigen.",
author = "Demers, {Raymond Y.} and Swanson, {G. Marie} and Weiss, {Linda K.} and Kau, {Tsing Ying}",
year = "1994",
month = "6",
day = "13",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "154",
pages = "1211--1216",
journal = "JAMA Internal Medicine",
issn = "2168-6106",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing incidence of cancer of the prostate. The experience of black and white men in the Detroit metropolitan area

AU - Demers, Raymond Y.

AU - Swanson, G. Marie

AU - Weiss, Linda K.

AU - Kau, Tsing Ying

PY - 1994/6/13

Y1 - 1994/6/13

N2 - Background: Prostate cancer mortality and incidence rates have been gradually increasing for decades in the United States, with an accelerated increase in incidence noted in the past several years. This study explores in detail the occurrence of prostate cancer in southeast Michigan from 1973 through 1991. Methods: Data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program are analyzed with emphasis on time trends by race, age, stage, and treatment. Results: Population-based rates for prostate cancer increased by 70% between 1988 and 1991. Increases are most pronounced for early stage disease and among whites compared with blacks. Corresponding increases in treatment with radical prostatectomy are also observed. Conclusion: Increased incidence of prostate cancer is likely a result of widespread use of prostate-specific antigen.

AB - Background: Prostate cancer mortality and incidence rates have been gradually increasing for decades in the United States, with an accelerated increase in incidence noted in the past several years. This study explores in detail the occurrence of prostate cancer in southeast Michigan from 1973 through 1991. Methods: Data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program are analyzed with emphasis on time trends by race, age, stage, and treatment. Results: Population-based rates for prostate cancer increased by 70% between 1988 and 1991. Increases are most pronounced for early stage disease and among whites compared with blacks. Corresponding increases in treatment with radical prostatectomy are also observed. Conclusion: Increased incidence of prostate cancer is likely a result of widespread use of prostate-specific antigen.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028309736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028309736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8203988

AN - SCOPUS:0028309736

VL - 154

SP - 1211

EP - 1216

JO - JAMA Internal Medicine

JF - JAMA Internal Medicine

SN - 2168-6106

IS - 11

ER -