Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis

Meredith Golomb, Gabrielle A. deVeber, Daune L. MacGregor, Trish Domi, Hilary Whyte, Derek Stephens, Paul T. Dick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have examined walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis. We looked at the development of walking in a retrospective and consecutive cohort study of 88 term and near-term neonates. We used Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards models to assess (1) sex, (2) stroke type (arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis), (3) number of cerebral hemispheres with infarction, and (4) presence of neonatal comorbidity as predictors of the probability over time of starting to walk independently. These variables were assessed as predictors of parent-reported gait normality using the chi-square test on 2 × 2 contingency tables. Seventy-five of 83 survivors (90.4%, 95% confidence interval = 81.9-95.7) walked with a median time of first steps at 13 months of age (95% confidence interval = 12-14). Only bilateral strokes were associated with a lower probability over time of initiating independent walking (hazard ratio = 0.41, P = .04). Parents reported normal gait for 58 of 75 walkers (77.3%, 95% confidence interval = 67.8-86.8). No variables predicted parent-reported gait normality. Our findings suggest that most survivors of neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis walk with a gait that appears normal to parents, but bilateral infarctions decrease the probability over time of starting to walk independently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)530-536
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume18
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003

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Walking
Thrombosis
Gait
Stroke
Confidence Intervals
Infarction
Walkers
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Cerebrum
Chi-Square Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Golomb, M., deVeber, G. A., MacGregor, D. L., Domi, T., Whyte, H., Stephens, D., & Dick, P. T. (2003). Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis. Journal of Child Neurology, 18(8), 530-536.

Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis. / Golomb, Meredith; deVeber, Gabrielle A.; MacGregor, Daune L.; Domi, Trish; Whyte, Hilary; Stephens, Derek; Dick, Paul T.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.08.2003, p. 530-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Golomb, M, deVeber, GA, MacGregor, DL, Domi, T, Whyte, H, Stephens, D & Dick, PT 2003, 'Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis', Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 530-536.
Golomb M, deVeber GA, MacGregor DL, Domi T, Whyte H, Stephens D et al. Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis. Journal of Child Neurology. 2003 Aug 1;18(8):530-536.
Golomb, Meredith ; deVeber, Gabrielle A. ; MacGregor, Daune L. ; Domi, Trish ; Whyte, Hilary ; Stephens, Derek ; Dick, Paul T. / Independent walking after neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and sinovenous thrombosis. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 530-536.
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