Indianapolis emergency medical service and the Indiana Network for Patient Care

evaluating the patient match algorithm.

Seong C. Park, John Finnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2009, Indianapolis launched an electronic medical record system within their ambulances1 and started to exchange patient data with the Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) This unique system allows EMS personnel to get important information prior to the patient's arrival to the hospital. In this descriptive study, we found EMS personnel requested patient data on 14% of all transports, with a "success" match rate of 46%, and a match "failure" rate of 17%. The three major factors for causing match "failure" were ZIP code 55%, Patient Name 22%, and Birth date 12%. We conclude that the ZIP code matching process needs to be improved by applying a limitation of 5 digits in ZIP code instead of using ZIP+4 code. Non-ZIP code identifiers may be a better choice due to inaccuracies and changes of the ZIP code in a patient's record.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1221-1228
Number of pages8
JournalAMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium
Volume2012
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Emergency Medical Services
Patient Care
Electronic Health Records
Names
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In 2009, Indianapolis launched an electronic medical record system within their ambulances1 and started to exchange patient data with the Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) This unique system allows EMS personnel to get important information prior to the patient's arrival to the hospital. In this descriptive study, we found EMS personnel requested patient data on 14{\%} of all transports, with a {"}success{"} match rate of 46{\%}, and a match {"}failure{"} rate of 17{\%}. The three major factors for causing match {"}failure{"} were ZIP code 55{\%}, Patient Name 22{\%}, and Birth date 12{\%}. We conclude that the ZIP code matching process needs to be improved by applying a limitation of 5 digits in ZIP code instead of using ZIP+4 code. Non-ZIP code identifiers may be a better choice due to inaccuracies and changes of the ZIP code in a patient's record.",
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