Individual adult human neurons display aneuploidy

Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization and single neuron PCR

Svetlana D. Pack, Robert J. Weil, Alexander Vortmeyer, Weifen Zeng, Jie Li, Hiroaki Okamoto, Makoto Furuta, Evgenia Pak, Irina A. Lubensky, Edward H. Oldfield, Zhengping Zhuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurons, once committed, exit the cell cycle and undergo maturation that promote specialized activity and are believed to operate upon a stable genome. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization, selective cell microdissection, and loss of heterozygosity analysis to assess degree of aneuploidy in patients with a neurodegenerative disease and in normal controls. We found that aneuploidy occurs in approximately 40% of mature, adult human neurons in health or disease and may be a physiological mechanism that maintains neuronal fate and function; it does not appear to be an unstable state. The fact that neuronal stem cells can be identified in adult humans and that somatic mosaicism may be found in neuronal precursor cells deserves further investigation before using adult neural stem cells to treat human disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1758-1760
Number of pages3
JournalCell Cycle
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aneuploidy
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Neurons
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Microdissection
Adult Stem Cells
Mosaicism
Neural Stem Cells
Loss of Heterozygosity
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cell Cycle
Stem Cells
Genome
Health

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Aneuploidy
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • Neurons
  • Progenitor cells
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Individual adult human neurons display aneuploidy : Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization and single neuron PCR. / Pack, Svetlana D.; Weil, Robert J.; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Zeng, Weifen; Li, Jie; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Furuta, Makoto; Pak, Evgenia; Lubensky, Irina A.; Oldfield, Edward H.; Zhuang, Zhengping.

In: Cell Cycle, Vol. 4, No. 12, 01.01.2005, p. 1758-1760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pack, SD, Weil, RJ, Vortmeyer, A, Zeng, W, Li, J, Okamoto, H, Furuta, M, Pak, E, Lubensky, IA, Oldfield, EH & Zhuang, Z 2005, 'Individual adult human neurons display aneuploidy: Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization and single neuron PCR', Cell Cycle, vol. 4, no. 12, pp. 1758-1760. https://doi.org/10.4161/cc.4.12.2153
Pack, Svetlana D. ; Weil, Robert J. ; Vortmeyer, Alexander ; Zeng, Weifen ; Li, Jie ; Okamoto, Hiroaki ; Furuta, Makoto ; Pak, Evgenia ; Lubensky, Irina A. ; Oldfield, Edward H. ; Zhuang, Zhengping. / Individual adult human neurons display aneuploidy : Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization and single neuron PCR. In: Cell Cycle. 2005 ; Vol. 4, No. 12. pp. 1758-1760.
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