Industry Support of Medical Research: Important Opportunity or Treacherous Pitfall?

William M. Tierney, Eric M. Meslin, Kurt Kroenke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pharmaceutical and device manufacturers fund more than half of the medical research in the U.S. Research funding by for-profit companies has increased over the past 20 years, while federal funding has declined. Research funding from for-profit medical companies is seen as tainted by many academicians because of potential biases and prior misbehavior by both investigators and companies. Yet NIH is encouraging partnerships between the public and private sectors to enhance scientific discovery. There are instances, such as methods for improving drug adherence and post-marketing drug surveillance, where the interests of academician researchers and industry could be aligned. We provide examples of ethically performed industry-funded research and a set of principles and benchmarks for ethically credible academic–industry partnerships that could allow academic researchers, for-profit companies, and the public to benefit.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 26 2015

Fingerprint

Biomedical Research
Industry
Research Personnel
Research
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Benchmarking
Financial Management
Marketing
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Industry Support of Medical Research : Important Opportunity or Treacherous Pitfall? / Tierney, William M.; Meslin, Eric M.; Kroenke, Kurt.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, 26.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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