Inflammatory cell infiltrate in a responding metastatic nodule after vaccine-based immunotherapy

Theodore Logan, B. Banner, U. Rao, M. S. Ernstoff, N. Wolmark, T. L. Whiteside, L. Miketic, J. M. Kirkwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A patient with von Hippel Lindau disease, bilateral symmetric renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases treated with immunotherapy is the subject of this study. A left kidney and tumour mass were removed and the tumour cells used to make an autologous tumour/bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine as part of the treatment protocol. The patient's pulmonary nodules responded, but the remaining renal nodule subsequently grew. Samples of both turnouts were obtained allowing for an internally controlled evaluation of the histological and immunohistologic differences between a responding and non- responding tumour nodule after therapy. The immunotherapy protocol is designed to promote a T cell response to autologous tumour. Cellular infiltrates were demonstrated in both responding and nonresponding nodules compared with the pretreatment tumour specimen, but the responding nodule contained proportionately more T cells as well as markedly increased numbers of plasma cells and granulocytes. This suggested that several arms of the immune system may have been operative in the responding nodule.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-354
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunotherapy
Vaccines
Neoplasms
von Hippel-Lindau Disease
BCG Vaccine
T-Lymphocytes
Kidney
Lung
Clinical Protocols
Plasma Cells
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Granulocytes
Immune System
Neoplasm Metastasis

Keywords

  • Autologous tumour vaccine
  • IL-2
  • Immunotherapy
  • In vitro
  • Renal cell cancer
  • Sensitization
  • T cell adoptive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Inflammatory cell infiltrate in a responding metastatic nodule after vaccine-based immunotherapy. / Logan, Theodore; Banner, B.; Rao, U.; Ernstoff, M. S.; Wolmark, N.; Whiteside, T. L.; Miketic, L.; Kirkwood, J. M.

In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Vol. 114, No. 3, 1998, p. 347-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Logan, T, Banner, B, Rao, U, Ernstoff, MS, Wolmark, N, Whiteside, TL, Miketic, L & Kirkwood, JM 1998, 'Inflammatory cell infiltrate in a responding metastatic nodule after vaccine-based immunotherapy', Clinical and Experimental Immunology, vol. 114, no. 3, pp. 347-354. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2249.1998.00731.x
Logan, Theodore ; Banner, B. ; Rao, U. ; Ernstoff, M. S. ; Wolmark, N. ; Whiteside, T. L. ; Miketic, L. ; Kirkwood, J. M. / Inflammatory cell infiltrate in a responding metastatic nodule after vaccine-based immunotherapy. In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 1998 ; Vol. 114, No. 3. pp. 347-354.
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